Construction on NW 23 project again unveils historic facade covered for decades in Oklahoma City

Former furniture store has granite, streamline-modern facade that stretches across three-fourths of the building at NW 23 and Walker.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: April 17, 2014 at 8:00 pm •  Published: April 16, 2014

Uptown developer Johnathan Russell will never look at old buildings the same way after discovering another historic facade hidden for decades by awnings and “modern” touches added more than 40 years ago.

Russell, who is developing the northwest corner at Walker Avenue and NW 23 into the upscale shopping center The Rise, previously joined restaurateur Chris Lower in celebrating the discovery of an intact 1920s era cast stone and brick facade at the future home of Pizzeria Gusto, 2415 N Walker Ave.

Russell is set to unveil yet another rediscovered facade Thursday night for the main building at The Rise, which once was home to a used hotel furniture and equipment store. The granite, streamline-modern style facade, stretches across the western three-fourths of the building.

“It’s 99 percent intact — it’s gorgeous, it’s amazing,” Russell said. “We knew there were some bones there, but we didn’t know what. So when we uncovered it, we needed to step back and make sure we knew how to preserve it right.”

With the latest discovery, Russell admits he bought the block really knowing the true appearance only of a mid-20th century Texaco gas station at 2425 N Walker Ave. that will be home to The Pump Bar.

Both Russell and his designer, Larry Pickering, say retail facades like the one that will adorn The Rise are rare.

“It’s cut granite,” Russell said. “And the suspended awning is still there. It’s insanely beautiful and to do that today, well, it’s just not doable.”

Pickering could not estimate the cost of recreating a granite retail facade in 2014.

“Nobody could afford it,” Pickering said. “It’s cost prohibitive. The materials that go into it, the craftsmanship, the shapes, it just can’t be done. There are so many buildings in Edmond and north Oklahoma City that do these classic details out of synthetic stucco. It’s the go-to product because it’s cheap. I hate that. Shopping centers don’t have to all look the same.”

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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It gives us a glimpse of what we had. And hopefully it will encourage people to save what else we still have.”

Larry Pickering,
Architect

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