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Country's energy diversification could benefit Oklahoma

Natural gas use for power generation will grow throughout the country over the next 25 years, but for different reasons across different regions, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said this week.
by Adam Wilmoth Modified: August 22, 2014 at 11:00 am •  Published: August 22, 2014


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Natural gas use for power generation will grow throughout the country over the next 25 years, but for different reasons across different regions, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said this week.

The agency said it expects natural gas-fired electric power generation for the lower 48 states to grow to 1.6 billion megawatt hours by 2040, up about 1.3 percent a year. The growth is projected to be fueled by a 56 percent boost in domestic natural gas production from 2012 to 2040.

The Southwest Power Pool — which is comprised of Oklahoma and parts of five surrounding states — is expected to see the smallest gain, although even here natural gas-fired power is expected to grow by more than 70 million megawatt hours.

The relatively slight growth likely is because the region already relies heavily on natural gas, which represents about 41 percent of Oklahoma’s power mix.

The three regions with the highest-projected growth are the western part of the country, Texas and much of the eastern half of the country, excluding Florida and New England. The eastern and western regions currently have the highest levels of coal-fired generation in the United States.

The EIA forecast shows coal power continuing to grow in the east along with natural gas, while the western region will include growth in natural gas and renewables. In Texas, natural gas is projected to represent almost all of the new power generation over the next quarter century.

While natural gas-fired power is expected to grow in the lower 48, another EIA report this week shows that Hawaii and the country’s island territories also are hoping to diversify their energy consumption.

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by Adam Wilmoth
Energy Editor
Adam Wilmoth returned to The Oklahoman as energy editor in 2012 after working for four years in public relations. He previously spent seven years as a business reporter at The Oklahoman, including five years covering the state's energy sector....
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