County commissioner: Local government best suited to handle local problems

BY GENE WALLACE Published: December 30, 2012
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Regarding “Changing county model makes good fiscal sense” (Our Views, Dec. 19): H.L. Mencken wrote, “For every complex problem, there is an answer that is clear, simple and wrong.” The never-ending ideas of the reinvention of government are fertile ground for nonresponsive, nonaccountable forms of consolidation.

The framers of the Oklahoma Constitution appeared to be driven by a consensus of thought — that local problems and services can best be addressed and solved by local people within their county. Thus, the creation of county government. Local governments such as elected water board members, school boards, cities and towns and the constitutional county government are the bedrock and gold standard for accountability that answers solely to its voters.

The Wharton School of Business, one of the nation's finest, found in a study that while the media spends its focus on state and national issues, local government accounts for more than 80 percent of all the rules, regulations and services that affect the citizens of a state. They provide the vital and emergency services, with a face, name and home within their community. There is an obvious commitment of accountability to serve locally that translates into efficiency of taxpayers' resources.

The framers had it right and creative minds of “progressive” ideas should proceed with caution. The voters demand and deserve government they know and trust. They would be reluctant to trade local control to a telephone recording that takes their request for services that affect their communities.