Crime comics' comeback included 'Ms. Tree,' 'Daredevil'

Crime comics were nearly left for dead in the United States following Senate hearings in the 1950s. But the genre came roaring back, perhaps most notably due to Frank Miller, whose “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” film, based on his comics, is in theaters now.
by Matthew Price Published: August 29, 2014
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As we saw in last week’s column, crime comics were nearly left for dead in the United States following Senate hearings in the 1950s. But the genre came roaring back, perhaps most notably due to Frank Miller, whose “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” film, based on his comics, is in theaters now.

Revival of a genre

As direct-market comic stores came to the fore in the late 1970s and early 1980s, comics moved further away from kiddie fare. As creators began to have more say in their comics, new publishers brought forth comics like “Ms. Tree” and “Maze Agency” in the crime and detective genres. Some of these comics went without adhering to the industry’s self-censoring Comics Code, for they didn’t need to be distributed on the newsstand; others, like Miller’s “Daredevil,” pushed the limits of the code in mainstream comics.

Daring breakthrough

Writer/artist Miller broke into comics in the late 1970s, and he first became a household name to comics fans with “Daredevil,” where he took what had been a more-or-less second-rate

Spider-Man and revamped him into the star of a crime comic.

“I had done a couple issues of ‘Spectacular Spider-Man,’ and I looked at Daredevil, (who) was blind. All of a sudden I realized that I could do all my crime stories through this character,” Miller told Graphic NYC.

Following Miller’s success on “Daredevil,” he brought a crime noir feel to his revered work on Batman with “Batman: Year One,” illustrated by David Mazzucchelli, and “The Dark Knight Returns,” which he wrote and illustrated himself.

Indie success

Another independent comics success in the early 1980s as comic-book shops were hungry for more involved material was Max Allan Collins’ “Ms. Tree.” Collins, a longtime fan of Mickey Spillane, was inspired by Mike Hammer to create “Ms. Tree.”

Ms. Tree was the hard-boiled Ms. Michael Tree, who avenges the death of her husband and fights against crime bosses and bad guys in a long-running independent comics series by Collins and artist Terry Beatty.

New life for crime

The comics boom of the 1990s led to strong sales across the board, but the success of comics like “Sin City” and David Lapham’s “Stray Bullets” showed new life in the crime genre just as directors like Quentin Tarantino showed a new respect for “pulp fiction” in the film industry.

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by Matthew Price
Features Editor
Features Editor Matthew Price has worked for The Oklahoman since 2000. He’s a University of Oklahoma graduate who has also worked at the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and was a Dow Jones Newspaper Fund intern for the Dallas Morning News. He’s...
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ONLINE

2010 interview with

Frank Miller:

www.nycgraphicnovelists.com/2010/12/frank-miller-part-1-dames-dark-knights.html

Video interview with Frank Miller about Daredevil:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3veX7NgKTM&feature=youtu.be

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