Cris Collinsworth to call his second Super Bowl

Former Bengals wide receiver didn't fare well as a player in the game
by Mel Bracht Modified: February 2, 2012 at 5:23 pm •  Published: February 2, 2012
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NBC analyst Cris Collinsworth, a former Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver, has some bad memories of the Super Bowl. His Bengals lost twice to the San Francisco 49ers (26-21 in 1982 and 20-16 in 1989) in the big game.

Collinsworth, who will broadcast Super Bowl XLVI with Al Michaels and sideline reporter Michele Tafoya, hopes it will go better in his second time in the broadcast booth. He also called Super Bowl XXXIX for Fox as New England edged Philadelphia 24-21.

“Well, I was 0-for-2 playing in this game so I'm hoping I do a better job with this one,” Collinsworth said in a conference call this week.

Collinsworth, 53, had some big shoes to fill when he replaced fan favorite John Madden in the NBC booth in 2009. A 12-time Emmy award winner, Collinsworth has earned mostly positive reviews for his commentary.

Collinsworth said preparing to call a Super Bowl is harder than getting ready to play in it.

“There are only so many things I had to prepare for as a player,” he said. “I was getting ready for San Francisco's defense on both occasions, and they could go only throw 11 of them out there at a time.”

Broadcast preparations involve getting to know as much as possible about both teams in a short period.

“It's all-consuming trying to imagine every possible thing that could come up and be a part of a Super Bowl broadcast,” he said. “The exciting part about it is you are on the high wire, and there is an element of danger to it.”

QUARTERBACK MATCHUP

Michaels, 67. who will broadcast his eighth Super Bowl, called the quarterback battle between Tom Brady and Eli Manning the key matchup of the game. It's the first time two Super Bowl MVP quarterbacks have faced each other in the game.

“Brady is one of the greatest of all time,” Michaels said. “I think Eli has also captured the fancy of everybody around the country, especially with the way he has played down the stretch. I don't think enough was made about the beating he took in the San Francisco game. They were all over him. There were a couple of incidents where I was watching the replay and I'm thinking he's going to need surgery. The next thing you know he is back in the huddle. He is a tough guy.”

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by Mel Bracht
Copy Editor, Sports Media
Mel Bracht is a copy editor on the presentation desk and also covers sports media. A 1978 graduate of Indiana University, Bracht has been a print journalist for 34 years. He started his career as sports editor of the Rensselaer (Ind.) Republican...
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