Dairy Boy lives on in Minco

Dairy Boy Drive-in, a walk-up burger and ice cream stand on Minco’s main drag, is one of the last remnants of a chain that once had restaurants in small towns across Oklahoma.
by Brianna Bailey Modified: August 18, 2014 at 2:00 pm •  Published: August 17, 2014


photo - Dairy Boy Drive In owner Karen Bratcher, left, and her daughter, Bobbie Sue Tallent finish an order at the family owned drive in located on SW 3rd St in Minco  Thursday  August  14, 2014. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman
Dairy Boy Drive In owner Karen Bratcher, left, and her daughter, Bobbie Sue Tallent finish an order at the family owned drive in located on SW 3rd St in Minco Thursday August 14, 2014. Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman

— Operated by the same family for the past 31 years, the Minco Dairy Boy Drive-In still offers soft-serve cones in three sizes — small, medium and giant.

The walk-up burger and ice cream stand on Minco’s main drag is one of the last remnants of the Dairy Boy Drive-In chain that once had restaurants in small towns across Oklahoma.

Wearing lipstick and baseball hats decorated in sequins and rhinestones, the Dairy Boy workers — there are no men or boys here, only women — serve up 2-foot-tall “giant” cones of soft-serve ice cream.

“You’d be surprised who orders one,” said Dairy Boy employee Rachel Weaver, the 18-year-old granddaughter of restaurant owner Karen Bratcher. “I had a little boy — he looked about 10 or 11 — order one, stand right out there and eat it and then come back and order another.”

Bratcher is unsure if the Minco Dairy Boy, which she and husband Bobby Bratcher purchased in 1983, was part of the original Dairy Boy chain. Newspaper advertisements from the chain dating back to 1958 show Roy and Dee Ann’s Dairy Boy in Minco as one of several Oklahoma locations.

There is also a surviving Dairy Boy restaurant in Okemah. Another Dairy Boy Drive-In in Lexington closed its doors last year.

A family affair

The restaurants all feature the mascot of a little boy in overalls carrying an oversized soft-serve ice cream cone.

The Minco Dairy Boy sits just off Main Street near the center of town on the route of the old Beale Wagon Road, a popular wagon route for settlers in the 1860s and and 1870s. The old U.S. Route 66 later followed much of the same route.

Bobbie Sue Tallent was just three months old when her parents bought the Minco Dairy Boy and spent much of her childhood behind the counter.

“I started as young as I can remember, opening boxes of napkins and straws,” Tallent said.

Tallent learned math by counting the money from the till and went into labor with her first child in the Dairy Boy kitchen. This summer, her daughter, now 8, also helped out at the restaurant for a few hours.

Once-booming business

The Dairy Boy Drive-In chain was founded in 1957 in Oklahoma city by businessman Harry Atlee and Leonard Hansen, owners of the Hansen-Atlee Dairy near SW 18 and Pennsylvania. No visible remnants of the dairy remain in the neighborhood today, which is a mix of warehouses and modest bungalow housing.

The Hansen-Atlee Dairy once offered home milk delivery in the Oklahoma City metro area, promising in newspaper advertisements of the time that its milk was more pure and richer than that of its competitors.

The dairy began selling franchise rights for Dairy Boy restaurants in small towns across the state in the late 1950s.

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by Brianna Bailey
Business Writer
Brianna Bailey has lived in Idaho, Germany and Southern California, but Oklahoma is her adopted home. She has a bachelor's degree in Journalism from the Univerisity of Oklahoma and has worked at several newspapers in Oklahoma and Southern...
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Unchained

This story is part of a series on Oklahoma’s forgotten retail chains.

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