Danny Boyle falls into a 'Trance'

But in a recent phone interview, director Danny Boyle told The Oklahoman that it was time to shake things up a bit. And while his near future will involve revisiting the subject of one of his earliest films, he felt he needed to venture off into a new direction for “Trance.”
BY GEORGE LANG glang@opubco.com Modified: April 11, 2013 at 5:06 pm •  Published: April 12, 2013
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“Trance” director Danny Boyle does not make a particular kind of film — he appears just as comfortable making a genre-bending zombie thriller as he does making a film a about saints, or drug addicts, or a last-ditch effort by astronauts to reignite the sun. Boyle actively butts heads with expectations and has done so since he made his directorial debut in 1994 with the dark comedy, “Shallow Grave.”

And yet, for a brief and recent period in his career, Boyle fell into a rare pattern when he made two films about individuals triumphing over unfathomable adversity. In 2009, “Slumdog Millionaire,” a triumphantly inspirational film that chronicles a young man's Horatio Alger story through his appearance on India's version of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire,” won eight Oscars, including best picture and best director. He followed “Slumdog” with “127 Hours,” the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston, who severed his arm with a dull utility knife in order to free himself from a rockslide. The film generated an Oscar nomination for star James Franco and mostly received rave reviews.

But in a recent phone interview, Boyle told The Oklahoman that it was time to shake things up a bit. And while his near future will involve revisiting the subject of one of his earliest films, he felt he needed to venture off into a new direction for “Trance.”

“You can become a certain kind of filmmaker,” Boyle said. “You make a couple of award-season films, and you kind of get locked in there. It's lovely to kind of let your hair down a bit, really, and kind of play.

“Obviously we did a couple of films which we were very lucky with, ‘Slumdog Millionaire' and ‘127 Hours,' that were lucky enough to get into the award season. And they were particular kinds of films, obviously, and we wanted to make a film for fun.”

But “Trance” is anything but a lark. A twisty experiment that melds elements of film noir, heist thrillers and science fiction, “Trance” follows crooked art auctioneer Simon (James McAvoy), whose audacious plan to steal a Francisco Goya painting takes him down a psychological rabbit hole in which hypnotic suggestion might be the only way out. The film, which also stars Rosario Dawson and Vincent Cassel, took Boyle into hard-edge emotional and visual territory at the same time he was directing his ambitious live production about the history of England for the opening of the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

“That was our day job, if you will,” Boyle said. “Then at night, when the moon came out, we made a dark, twisted thriller about what's happening to your mind. And believe me, when you're making the Olympic Opening Ceremony, you sometimes wonder what is happening to your mind.”

The origins of “Trance” go back to the time of “Shallow Grave,” when the story's original writer, Joe Ahearne, approached Boyle about doing a story about hypnosis and suggestibility. While Boyle was intrigued, he moved on to 1996's “Trainspotting,” the adaptation of Irvine Welsh's pitch-black novel about Scottish heroin addicts that launched Boyle into the directorial A-list.

Ahearne, a lead writer on the 2005 relaunch of “Doctor Who,” made a TV version of “Trance” in 2001, but once Boyle and his “Shallow Grave” and “Trainspotting” collaborator John Hodge, decided to re-explore the story, they saw an opportunity to explore many layers of consciousness and reality.

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