DC Notes: Republican Rep.-elect Markwayne Mullin says he'll oppose higher tax revenue

Mullin and Oklahoma senators says state secession unrealistic; White House sets date for fourth annual tribal nations conference in Washington
by Chris Casteel Published: November 18, 2012
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Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Tulsa, also called the petitions unrealistic.

“I can see a solution in (Republicans) taking over the Senate” in 2014, he said.

There were petitions on the We the People section of the White House website for all 50 states to secede. Petitions that garner at least 25,000 signatures within 30 days can get an official response from the White House. On Friday afternoon, one Oklahoma petition had 17,203 signatures, while the second had 8,966.

A petition seeking Texas' secession had more than 111,000 signatures.

For comparison's sake, here are some other petitions on the website and their level of support on Friday:

• “Outlaw offending prophets of major religions,” 37,358 signatures

• “Remove marijuana from the federal Controlled Substance Act and allow the states to decide how they want to regulate it,” 57,772 signatures

• “Nationalize the Twinkie industry,” 218 signatures

• “Provide University graduates ability to trade their diplomas back for 100% tuition refunds,” 741 signatures

• “Deport Everyone That Signed A Petition To Withdraw Their State From The United States of America,” 22,972 signatures

• “Not Allow The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) To Regulate Premium Cigars,” 33,579 signatures

• “Establish new legal system of motorcycle riding ‘Judges' who serve as police, judge, jury, and executioner all in one,” 1,984 signatures

Tribal conference set

The White House will host its fourth annual Tribal Nations Conference on Dec. 5, with invites going out to all 566 of the federally recognized tribes.

President Barack Obama typically speaks to the tribal representatives at the beginning and end of the daylong conferences, which feature sessions with cabinet secretaries and agency heads about issues important to Indian country.

Indian leaders from Oklahoma have praised the Obama administration's engagement with tribes, saying their input has been sought and sincerely considered before policy decisions are made.

At last year's conference, Chickasaw Nation Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel, the president of the National Congress of American Indians, said, “We've made some real gains in the past three years with this administration. He made some commitments to Indian Country and he's fulfilled them.”

In September, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker called Obama “the best president for Indian Country in the history of the United States.”

by Chris Casteel
Washington Bureau
Chris Casteel began working for The Oklahoman's Norman bureau in 1982 while a student at the University of Oklahoma. After covering the police beat, federal courts and the state Legislature in Oklahoma City, he moved to Washington in 1990, where...
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