Decade after attack, tears for dead, hope for Bali

Associated Press Modified: October 12, 2012 at 7:01 am •  Published: October 12, 2012
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Other Balinese suffer still more intensely from the attacks, which killed 38 Indonesians and injured many more.

Tumini, who like many Indonesians uses only one name, was a bartender getting ready to serve her first customer that night at Paddy's Pub. She was thrown outside the bar and knocked unconscious. The only thing she remembers is waking up in the hospital with burns covering her face and body.

Today, the mother of three still struggles to understand why she survived when so many others died. She was forced to find lower-paying work and cannot afford the medical care she needs.

"I feel my life is still miserable. I am not 100 percent normal," she said. "I often think and ask why God still allows me to live if I have to endure this pain."

Most of Indonesia's 210 million Muslims practice a moderate style of Islam that condemns violence, and the government has worked to root out militants, arresting more than 700 of them since the bombings and killing dozens more. Terrorist attacks aimed at foreigners have been largely replaced in recent years by smaller, less deadly strikes mostly targeting police and anti-terrorism forces.

"Instead of spreading the seeds of hatred, that heinous attack has prompted governments and peoples of different backgrounds, of different nationalities and religions, to reach out to one another," said Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa. "To stand united."

Tourism, meanwhile, has bounced back. More than 1.8 million foreigners arrived in Bali prior to the attacks, and last year 2.7 million came to the island where Julia Roberts filmed part of the movie "Eat, Pray, Love."

"It was a big thing for Australia because this is ... like our second home to come to. It was pretty devastating but you know, it happens all over the world," Mitch O'Brian said while enjoying a holiday in Bali. "I'm not afraid to come here because it's a great place."

Security was tight at Friday's memorial with more than 2,000 police and military deployed, including snipers. Two days earlier, police said they had received information about a potential terrorist threat. Bali deputy police chief Brig. Gen. Ketut Untung Yoga Ana said new intelligence indicates the threat may have weakened, but he added that security forces would remain vigilant and continue to closely monitor movement in and out of the island.

Last month police arrested 10 Islamic militants and seized a dozen homemade bombs from a group suspected of planning suicide attacks, but to Bali hotel operator Gde Wiratha, that was in part a sign that the threat remains.

"Bali was very safe before the bombing ... but now no one knows," he said. "I, myself, still have fears that radical groups like Jemaah Islamiyah are still far from being defeated."

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Associated Press writers Kristen Gelineau in Sydney and Niniek Karmini in Jakarta, Indonesia contributed to this report.



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