Share “Despite arguments to the contrary,...”

Despite arguments to the contrary, American dream still a reality

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board Published: June 18, 2014
Advertisement

AS the Mark Twain maxim has it, untruth comes in three flavors: lies, damned lies and statistics. This certainly seems to be the case with the “income inequality” crusade led by Barack Obama, AKA The Great Divider.

A recent report by the Manhattan Institute, “Income Inequality In America: Fact And Fiction,” shows that much of the perceived increase in income inequality is driven by demographic factors, not any actual reduction in opportunity or quality of life.

“Many commentators today bemoan a supposed inequality in the United States,” writes Diana Furchtgott-Roth, director of the Manhattan Institute’s economics center, Economics21. “Much of this concern is a ‘problem in search of reality’, caused by problems of measurement and changes in demographic patterns over the past quarter-century. Government data on spending patterns show remarkable stability over the past 25 years and, if anything, a narrowing rather than an expansion of inequality.”

Furchtgott-Roth notes that one major flaw in many analyses is the failure to account for demographic shifts, such as the increase in two-earner families. In 1990, median income for a family with one earner was about $41,800. By 2012, it was about $43,300. Meanwhile, median income for families with two earners rose from about $71,000 to about $82,600 during the same period. That trend alone, Furchtgott-Roth notes, generates “a measured increase in inequality.”

For the most part, the increased income of two-earner families reflects the growing earning power of women. Obama often claims he objects to women being paid less than men, while simultaneously denouncing the supposed increase in income inequality. While most agree that women and men with the same job experience doing the same work should earn equal pay, achieving that goal ultimately increases broader income inequality.

The increased longevity of seniors and higher numbers of divorced people and single-parent households also contribute to the perception of growing income inequality. In 1960, 13 percent of households had just one person. By 2011, that share had grown to 27 percent. Overall, Furchtgott-Roth notes, 72 percent of women living alone are in the bottom two quintiles, and the trends are similar for men. In comparison, 58.4 percent of married couples are in the top two quintiles.

Continue reading this story on the...

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board
The Oklahoman Editorial Board consists of Gary Pierson, President and CEO of The Oklahoma Publishing Company; Christopher P. Reen, president and publisher of The Oklahoman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor and vice president of news; Christy Gaylord...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    The Winner of The National Dog Show Is ...
  2. 2
    OPEC Policy Ensures U.S. Shale Crash, Russian Tycoon Says
  3. 3
    Pharrell Williams in Ebony interview: Why aren't we talking about Michael Brown's 'bullyish'...
  4. 4
    Crime author PD James dies at age 94
  5. 5
    Supreme Court faces a new frontier: Threats on Facebook
+ show more