Despite rocky region, Israeli tourism booming

Associated Press Modified: August 11, 2012 at 3:17 am •  Published: August 11, 2012
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JERUSALEM (AP) — It's priming for a risky showdown with Iran over its suspected nuclear program, concerned about neighboring Syria's bloody civil war spilling across the border and dealing with terrorists attempting to infiltrate from Egypt's lawless Sinai Peninsula.

But that doesn't seem to be deterring hundreds of thousands of tourists from flocking to Israel each month. Despite the region's turmoil, Israel is enjoying an unexpected tourism boom, and 2012 is shaping up to be a record year.

Nearly 300,000 tourists arrived in July, a record for the month and an 8 percent increase over the previous July, according to the Tourism Ministry. The trend is nothing new: The ministry says each month of 2012 so far has set an all-time record for that month.

"It's a period where, on the face of it, we should be struggling with an economic downturn and the Arab Spring around us," said Uri Steinberg, head of the America department at the Tourism Ministry, "but it hasn't worked out that way."

He said Israel initially hoped that tourists fearful of traveling to Egypt would choose Israel instead. But more often than not, he said, tourists planned Israel-Egypt combo tours and then put off the whole trip because of the unrest in Egypt.

Israel has more than made up the difference with American and eastern European travelers, who are arriving to the Holy Land in record numbers.

Just a decade ago, Israel was overwhelmed with suicide bombings and shooting attacks on buses and restaurants that killed more than 1,000 Israelis and devastated incoming tourism. With the recent years of calm, a post-9/11 sense that Israel is no longer disproportionately dangerous and an aggressive worldwide campaign to promote Israeli tourism, the tables have turned.

Steinberg said Israel has also become a destination for specialized tourism. These include Jewish and Christian faith-based travelers to the Holy Land, bird watchers, opera fans and marathon buffs.

Gay travel has also provided a boost. Tel Aviv was recently crowned by readers of the travel website GayCities and American Airlines customers as "Best Gay City of 2011," ahead of New York, Toronto and London.

Young American Jews taking part in organized trips, such as Birthright Israel, are increasingly spreading the word back home to older, wealthier relatives.

"Faith-based travel, though, is our bread and butter," said Steinberg. "There are 85 million Americans who identify as Evangelical, and they all want to visit."