Dibble's Tazden Jevons does not horse around on the football field or pasture

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS -- The Demons' running back has been kicked in the chest, stomped on, bitten and head-butted — and none of that came on the football field.
by Scott Wright Published: October 3, 2013
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photo - Dibble football player Tazden Jevons, who breaks horses, stands with Dreamer in Dibble, Okla., Oct. 2, 2013. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman
Dibble football player Tazden Jevons, who breaks horses, stands with Dreamer in Dibble, Okla., Oct. 2, 2013. Photo by Bryan Terry, The Oklahoman

DIBBLE — Tazden Jevons has been kicked in the chest, stomped on, bitten and head-butted.

It sounds like a typical Friday night for a small-school running back just about anywhere in Oklahoma.

But those moments didn't come on the football field for the Dibble standout.

No, Jevons took those beatings in his own backyard, where he enjoys his second passion: horses.

When the 6-foot-1, 215-pound running back isn't taking on defensive linemen who want to put him on his back, he can often be found breaking a horse that might very well have the same goal.

“It's tough. You get thrown around, knocked down,” Jevons said, with a smile on his face. “It's a lot of work, constantly working with the horse and slowly working your way along.”

Playing rough has never scares Jevons. It's just his persona, whether he's on the football field or in the pasture.

“There's not much Tazden does that isn't rough,” said his mother, Kathy Jevons. “He doesn't have much fear of anything.”

Taz was a defensive lineman when he played youth football, but eventually worked his way to linebacker. In junior high, coaches tried him out at running back, and it stuck.

As a junior, he rushed for 1,918 yards and 27 touchdowns on 217 carries and has averaged over 10 yards per carry the last two seasons.

He has the size and strength to gain NCAA Division I recruiting attention, likely as a linebacker, but his toughness sets him apart, especially on the Class 2A level.

“The thing that makes him good is that he's reckless,” Dibble coach J.R. Conrad said. “Lately, he's been banged up, and I don't know if he knows how to respond to that yet. When he's cautious, he's not the same player. We haven't seen the Tazden Jevons in 2013.

“He's a special player, though. Not only is he our best player, our toughest player, but he's a calming effect for everybody, because they know what to expect from him on game night.”

Jevons has taken a worse beating on the football field than from his horses the last few weeks. He broke his nose on the third play of the season, and broke his finger the next week, forcing him to play with a large, padded cast on his left hand. He also suffered a knee injury that slowed him down for a week or two.

“It's a little tough for me to watch him out there,” said Kathy Jevons. “He's got a broken nose, a cast on his hand and a banged-up knee, and he's running right down the middle of the pack.”


by Scott Wright
Reporter
A lifelong resident of the Oklahoma City metro area, Scott Wright has been on The Oklahoman staff since 2005, covering a little bit of everything on the state's sports scene. He has been a beat writer for football and basketball at Oklahoma and...
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