Disgraced McLoud schoolteacher moved to Kansas prison

High-profile Oklahoma convict and disgraced former teacher Kimberly Ann Crain has been moved to a prison in Kansas because state Corrections Department officials fear for her safety, the woman's attorney told The Oklahoman.
by Andrew Knittle Modified: September 1, 2013 at 10:00 am •  Published: September 1, 2013
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High-profile Oklahoma convict and disgraced former teacher Kimberly Ann Crain has been moved to a prison in Kansas because state Corrections Department officials fear for her safety, the woman's attorney told The Oklahoman.

It does not appear that Crain was assaulted or involved in any altercations during her short time at the Mabel Bassett Correctional Center in McLoud, the same city she was teaching in before her arrest.

Cregg Webb, the woman's attorney, said that Crain is unhappy with the decision, despite letters she wrote to a judge shortly before she was sentenced expressing fear for her own safety in Oklahoma prisons.

Crain was convicted in January of 20 sex crimes against children, many of them her former students, and sentenced two months later to more than four decades behind bars by Pottawatomie County District Judge John Canavan.

Before being transferred to the reception center at Mabel Bassett, she was held at the Pottawatomie County jail for more than a year.

State Corrections Department officials will only say that Crain has been transferred out of state and is no longer in one of Oklahoma's prisons.

“Usually, when people are moved out of state, it's out of our fear for their safety,” said Jerry Massie, spokesman for the state Corrections Department.

“But I can't say anything about any particular case ... as far as why she was moved.”

Massie said Crain was at Mabel Bassett for about a month after she was transferred from county jail.

“She was single-celled on the receiving unit until she was transferred out of state,” he said.

“She wasn't involved in anything other than going through the assessment and classification process.”


by Andrew Knittle
Investigative Reporter
Andrew Knittle has covered state water issues, tribal concerns and major criminal proceedings during his career as an Oklahoma journalist. He has won reporting awards from the state's Associated Press bureau and prides himself on finding a real...
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