Disturbing the peace charge dismissed against Oklahoma grandmother

by Randy Ellis Published: November 26, 2012
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Only 90 signatures were necessary, so the audit will be done, he indicated.

The petition cites six items that residents would like to see audited:

• Possible irregularities in city purchasing policies and procedures, including violation of city ordinances for the purchase of goods and services.

• Possible irregularities and a review of the costs associated with the Beaver Public Works Authority's operation of The Dunes recreational area at a loss in excess of its budget.

• Possible irregularities and/or misuse of public funds and review of the costs associated with the Beaver Public Works Authority's water utility billing practices, operations and usage reporting.

• Possible irregularities and violations of the Oklahoma Open Records Act.

• Possible irregularities and violations of the Oklahoma Open Meeting Act.

• Possible misappropriation of public property, equipment and/or resources for personal use.

Town must pay bill

The petition notes the audit is expected to cost between $15,000 and $20,000 and the town of Beaver will be required to pay the bill.

Mayor Janko said she believes it “would be a shame” if Beaver has to pay that much for a special audit, since the town is audited annually anyway.

Jamison, who recently resigned as town treasurer, said she has grown increasingly frustrated with the way she and townspeople have been treated by trustees and believes something needs to be done.

“When people are not allowed to speak or contribute to the community, it's really frustrating,” Jamison said, calling the trustees' treatment of Fisher “appalling” and “reprehensible.”

Jamison said trustees made implied threats to cut her $37,000 salary as treasurer before she quit last week.

Fisher said she is concerned by recent developments, including decisions by trustees to no longer record public meetings and to alter agendas so time for public comments is no longer provided.

Janko said it is left up to the person taking minutes whether meetings are recorded.

And she said boards are not required to allow public comments.

“We've always had that before, but it has gotten kind of out of hand because, sadly, the wheel that squeaks the loudest always gets the most attention,” Janko said.

She said public comments were not allowed at the last meeting because there was a lot of business that needed to be conducted.

Janko said she doesn't know whether public comments will be allowed at future meetings.

“We've had a lot of trouble out here, and we're trying to get on a positive track, and there's just so much negative,” Janko said.

by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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