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Division I schools flock again to Kansas JUCOs

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 7, 2014 at 6:41 am •  Published: February 7, 2014
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EL DORADO, Kan. (AP) — Troy coach Larry Blakeney might as well have bought a house in Kansas. Or at least rented a nice apartment within driving distance of its many junior colleges.

Blakeney has been around long enough to know the number of Division I prospects that schools in the Jayhawk Conference spit out each year. He's gone after many of them in the past, as have more high-profile schools such as Auburn and Florida State.

So it was little surprise that he began plugging holes on next year's team by taking a trip to the Sunflower State. And by the time national signing day rolled around Wednesday, and all the letters of intent were collected, six of his 19 prospects were from Kansas junior colleges.

"We felt like we needed some immediate help in certain positions on defense, and offense," Blakeney said, "and you know, we found the answer we think at the community college level."

Three of his answers came from Butler County Community College, one of the most dominant JUCO programs in the country. The rest came from Hutchinson, Dodge City and Coffeyville.

The six prospects headed to Troy represent a fraction of the nearly four dozen players from the Jayhawk Conference's eight schools to sign letters of intent with Division I schools.

"They have great coaching. They compete at a very, very high level," said Tennessee coach Butch Jones, who signed defensive tackle Owen Williams out of Butler and highly regarded offensive tackle Dontavius Blair out of Garden City Community College.

"We're excited because they're talented players," Jones said. "They've come in already. They're good people, and they have a very, very good skill set already established in terms of the strength and conditioning program and the total development of the individual."

That's one of the lures of community college players: They're ready step in immediately.

In most cases, they have one or two years of experience — along with mental and physical maturity — that gives them an edge over high school prospects. And that means that someone like Blair, whom Rivals.com ranked the seventh-best JUCO recruit in the country, can step into the starting lineup his first year on campus.

This isn't a new trend. The junior college in Kansas have been producing Division I stars for years, many of whom have gone on to sterling NFL careers.

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