Don't Forget the Thanksgiving Centerpiece

Sherrel Jones helps finalize your Thanksgiving feast with a makeshift centerpiece.
BY SHERREL JONES Modified: November 26, 2013 at 2:53 pm •  Published: November 27, 2013
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With all the Thanksgiving feast planning, it would be easy to forget about the centerpiece.

It's too late to order one from the florist, but there are still some beautiful leaves right outside to gather. The colors will serve as a bed for some fresh fruits that we can enjoy later. Table grapes are fantastic right now. Bosc pears and some nuts streaming away from a small sugar pumpkin in the center of the table is simple and elegant.

It's almost time for leftovers, but as a dear friend of mine says, “planned overs.” I'm already thinking of what to do with all the stuff left from Thanksgiving dinner. The turkey itself makes the best gumbo orchestrated from the carcass. I keep whole frozen okra pods on hand to make that happen.

Of course, if I roast an extra turkey breast, there will be plenty for those favorite turkey sandwiches. This year I'm going to make sure I have a loaf or two of Braum's Buttermilk Bread on hand. My husband remains a huge fan of white bread on his sandwiches, so he sometimes makes a stop at our nearest Braum's on the way home just to get a loaf of that buttermilk bread.

I'm a die-hard whole-wheat and pumpernickel girl myself, so I haven't been keen on going back to the white loaves I grew up with. I couldn't help but notice the beautiful texture of the buttermilk loaf while making my husband's sandwich, so I made one for myself. Wow. I would say these buttermilk loaves are tops for flavor, texture and freshness. It makes me feel good to support a product made by a company with strong Oklahoma roots.

Speaking of breads, if you made some of that popular pumpkin bread and have a little left over, cut it into cubes and add it along with any leftover dinner rolls to a bread pudding. Mixed with other breads or even as a stand alone ingredient in bread pudding the rich moist parcels of pumpkin embedded into mix are so good, you may want to make the pumpkin bread just to mix it into the pudding.

You might also try recycling a few of those dinner rolls into cinnamon toast crisps. That's right: crisps. They are sliced, buttered, sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar then baked in the oven at 350 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes until crisp and golden brown. These little tidbits keep well and are great to enjoy with a cup of tea or hot cider while decorating the tree.