Duncan's Bindery in Oklahoma City is to become upscale housing

The 78-year-old Duncan's Bindery building, a well-known but blighted building along a main entry into downtown, is to be renovated into an upscale home by a woman who admits she desires to become downtown's next urban pioneer.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: October 4, 2013 at 5:00 pm •  Published: October 3, 2013

The 78-year-old Duncan's Bindery building, a well-known but blighted building along a main entry into downtown, is to be renovated into an upscale home by a woman who admits she desires to become downtown's next urban pioneer.

The building at 36 NE 10 is seen by more than 12,000 motorists who exit Interstate 235 onto Oklahoma Avenue to travel to downtown and the Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Until recently, the white stucco building was best known for its large signage that once read “Jesus Saves.”

The future resident, Tarena Self, bought the building purposely looking for a fixer-upper, and her architect, Wade Scaramucci, believes that is exactly what they to work with over the next year.

“I got involved with this through Berg Belanger (a downtown broker), and he had mentioned she was trying to find a building, was interested in becoming an urban pioneer,” Scaramucci said. “She was not interested in a newer project — she wanted something that might need some work.”

Self, who lives at Regency Tower, said she long desired to live downtown, and first looked at a couple of properties on NW 7 and NW 8 near Broadway.

She then started talking to the Duncan family about three years ago.

The Duncans built the building and operated a binding company for Bibles and religious materials for several decades.

In addition to the Jesus Saves sign, they had a display along NW 10 depicting the resurrection of Jesus.

The Duncan family later moved their binding operation to newer adjoining buildings to the west.

At one time, the upstairs of the original building had seven sleeping rooms, each of which came with a bed, bathroom and desk, with access to a common kitchen.

The building was last rented to an antique store more than a decade ago.

“Quite a few people had tried to buy the building, but most wanted to tear it down for the location,” Self said. “That's how we started visiting.”

Self wanted to restore the building, and keep the Duncan's Bindery and Jesus Saves signs intact.

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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