DVD review: 'Thunderstruck'

The Blu-ray edition of “Thunderstruck” is instructive for showing how NBA star Kevin Durant and on-set coaches worked to help co-star Taylor Gray find his footing on the court.
Oklahoman Published: November 23, 2012
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‘Thunderstruck'

(Blu-ray + DVD + Ultraviolet)

“Thunderstruck,” the feature-film debut by Oklahoma City Thunder superstar Kevin Durant, lifted its talent-switching premise from 1996's “Space Jam” and is so lightweight it almost achieves infinite hang time. Filmed in Oklahoma City and Baton Rouge, La., “Thunderstruck” is strictly an artifact for die-hard KD fans, and fans that saw the film once or twice during its local premiere have either reached or exceeded their allotment for repeat viewings. Still, the Blu-ray edition of “Thunderstruck” is instructive for showing how Durant and on-set coaches worked to help co-star Taylor Gray find his footing on the court.

Gray plays Brian, a Thunder superfan who is dangerously bad on the court but, through a supernatural twist of fate, he switches talent with Durant, who immediately starts throwing bricks. Gray is not National Basketball Association material, but on special features included on the Blu-ray such as “KD's Klinic” and “From Backboards to Clapboards,” Gray goes into detail on learning how to execute Durant's signature moves like the “62” and the “Counter 62,” and conversely, Durant and the filmmakers discuss the challenges of introducing a nonactor into a filmmaking environment and making it work.

As for other extras, most of co-star Tristin Mays' “Video Blog” is worth skipping except for a shot of Durant wearing a prosthetic backpiece for a cut scene in which No. 35 undergoes acupuncture to correct his losing streak. A lot of work went into the sequence, and when it shows up in the “Deleted Scenes” section, it is clear that time was wasted on something too awful to salvage. “Thunderstruck” is a souvenir from the Thunder's 2012 season and Durant is engaged throughout, but as filmmaking goes, it's not much more than a pickup game.

George Lang