DVD reviews: 'Django' double features

Unofficial and unintentionally funny ‘Django' sequels abound.
Published: December 7, 2012
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‘Django' Double Features

Ever since Sergio Corbucci took his cue from Sergio Leone and became the second most successful director of “spaghetti” Westerns with 1966's “Django,” the title character has followed a long and twisting trail through more than 30 unofficial sequels (and one official one, “Django 2,” in 1987) with almost as many different actors playing the gunslinging drifter originally portrayed by Franco Nero (Sir Lancelot of Joshua Logan's “Camelot,” husband of Vanessa Redgrave).

The original film, considered one of the most violent Westerns up to that time, was also critically applauded in some quarters, but many subsequent efforts bearing the Django brand were low-budget knock-offs helmed by Leone/Corbucci wannabes. Timeless Media Group has released four of these films as double features on two separate DVDs.

One disc contains “A Man Called Django!” (1971, Italian title: “W Django!”), starring Anthony Steffen — real name Antonio Luis — in the title role, directed by Edward G. Muller, aka Edoardo Mulargier. It's violent, but not graphically so, and intentionally funny one minute, unintentionally hilarious the next. It's also loaded with references to the “Dollar” trilogy, but deadpan Steffen is no Clint Eastwood. As in the original “Django,” the anti-hero is tracking down the murderers of his wife.

The second feature is “Django and Sartana's Showdown in the West” (1970, original title “Arrivano Django E Sartana ... E La Fine,” aka “Django and Sartana Are Coming ... It's the End”), directed by — I kid you not — Dick Spitfire, aka Demofilo Fidani, aka Miles Deem, and starring Chet Davis, aka Franco Borelli, as Django. In this one, Django and the Lone Ranger-like Sartana are attempting to retrieve a kidnapped ranch woman from Mexican bandits. This one's pretty hilarious, and not on purpose. It has a villain who plays cards with himself in front of a mirror, a scene of course intending to telegraph that he's scary crazy.

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