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Economist discusses using financial instruments for good at University of Oklahoma

With the onset of the global recession, the public reputation of the finance sector has taken a major hit. So naturally, said economist Richard Sandor, it's difficult for some to view the sector as a potential driver of public good.
by Silas Allen Published: October 7, 2012
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With the onset of the global recession, the public reputation of the finance sector took a major hit.

So naturally, economist Richard Sandor said, it's difficult for some to view the sector as a potential driver of public good. Sandor spoke recently at the University of Oklahoma.

“Right now, finance ranks with the world's oldest profession in terms of world recognition,” Sandor said.

Often regarded as the “father of financial futures,” Sandor was involved in the creation of interest rate futures while he served as the vice president and chief economist of the Chicago Board of Trade in the early 1970s.

OU President David Boren called Sandor “one of the most innovative economists in this country.” Sandor and his wife, Ellen, have been major players in the life of the university, he said, including donating portions of their photography collection to the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

In 2003, Sandor established the now-defunct Chicago Climate Exchange, the first voluntary greenhouse cap and trade system. Under that system, a range of corporations and other entities — including OU — pledged to reduce their carbon emissions by 6 percent. Atlanta-based financial firm InterContinental Exchange bought the exchange in 2010.

More recently, Sandor penned the book “Good Derivatives: A Story of Financial and Environmental Innovation.” The book was released in April.

Although the financial sector has been seen recently as greedy and irresponsible, Sandor said, it has the capacity to bring about major global changes. The reason is relatively simple: putting a price on something is a good way to ration its use, he said. When a commodity is expensive, people take care of it.

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by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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Derivatives are like hammers. They can be used to crack somebody's skull, or they can be used to build houses.”

Richard Sandor

Economist

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