Economists say Oklahoma City's economic growth is sustainable, not just a boom

A panel of economists gathered Thursday by the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber assured civic leaders that despite the city's hot economic growth, the current good times are sustainable and not just another energy boom destined to go bust.
by Steve Lackmeyer Published: November 30, 2012
Advertisement
;

A panel of economists gathered Thursday by the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber assured civic leaders that despite the city's red-hot economic growth, the current good times are sustainable and not just another energy boom destined to go bust.

At the same time, panelists warned that a recent decision by Gov. Mary Fallin to opt out of an Affordable Health Care Act program will cost the state billions and do nothing to combat a burgeoning poverty rate. They also agreed state lawmakers are misguided in trying to further reduce the state income tax rate and should instead focus on sales taxes.

Robert Dauffenbach, professor and director of the Center for Economic and Management Research at the University of Oklahoma, recalled that early in his career, Oklahoma City was overshadowed by Tulsa as “the real city with its act together.”

Dauffenbach noted that while the energy industry contributes greatly to the local economy, Oklahoma City's Metropolitan Area Projects initiative and other quality-of-life efforts are to credit for the city's forward momentum.

“Those seeds invested years ago are paying handsomely today,” Dauffenbach said. “Oklahoma City pulled it together, and Tulsa seems to have lost it for some reason. There's something going on in this community that is keeping it together for a very sustainable future.”

But challenges remain, warned Dauffenbach and fellow economists Mickey Hepner, Dan Rickman and Russell Evans.

Dauffenbach said Oklahoma City has lost 20,000 manufacturing jobs since industrial employment peaked in 2000. Over the past dozen years, the city has added 20,000 jobs in health care with more growth ahead as the baby boom generation continues to hit retirement age.

“The crest of that wave has yet to come to us,” Dauffenbach said.

Hepner, dean of the school of business at the University of Central Oklahoma, cautioned that Fallin did not do the state's impoverished residents any favors when she decided earlier this month to not expand Medicaid as part of the Affordable Health Care Act.

The legislation, Hepner said, would have allowed adults up to 133 percent of the poverty rate to enroll in Medicaid, with the federal government paying up to 130 percent of the expense in what would have been a 10:1 match in spending.

“We just turned away additional money that could have generated billions of dollars of economic growth in this state,” Hepner said. “From an anti-poverty perspective, that was a mistake. From an economic development perspective, it was an incredible mistake. It was an incredible opportunity that was wasted.”


by Steve Lackmeyer
Reporter Sr.
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    College of Charleston president orders second investigation of Doug Wojcik
  2. 2
    Joe Paterno's son Jay sues Penn State for 'improper termination'
  3. 3
    Former Dallas Cowboys running back Robert Newhouse dead at 64
  4. 4
    Oklahoma man gets consecutive 20-year terms for rapes of intellectually challenged classmates
  5. 5
    Angels won't cap former OU pitcher Garrett Richards' innings
+ show more