Edmond doctor 'got off light' for role in fraud, board member says

An Edmond doctor will be issued a letter of reprimand and made to perform 200 hours of community service after he admitted to helping a woman obtain $20,000 in bonuses by writing unnecessary prescriptions for the anti-inflammatory drug Zipsor.
by Andrew Knittle Published: March 8, 2013
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An Edmond doctor will be issued a letter of reprimand and required to perform 200 hours of community service after he admitted to helping a woman obtain $20,000 in bonuses by writing unnecessary prescriptions for the anti-inflammatory drug Zipsor.

Dr. Gary Dickinson and an attorney appeared Thursday before the Oklahoma Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision, along with several other medical professionals facing possible disciplinary action.

According to a complaint filed by the medical board, Dickinson began writing prescriptions for Zipsor to a pharmaceutical sales representative named Tara Linville in February 2010.

Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals, the company that sold Zipsor at the time, paid a $30 bonus each time a prescription for the drug was filled at a pharmacy in Linville's sales territory, board documents show.

A medical board attorney wrote in the complaint that Xanodyne Pharmaceuticals would pay the $30 bonus regardless of the size of the prescription.

At first, Dickinson worked only with Linville and her husband, but he would end up writing prescriptions to various friends and family members of the couple.

Records show Dickinson would write his prescriptions for just one dose, but he would authorize up to 12 refills.

In March 2010, Dickinson wrote 17 prescriptions to various family members of Linville. Each one of them included an authorization for 12 refills.

Dickinson would continue writing the prescriptions for Linville's friends and family until August 2010. That month, the doctor wrote 16 single-dose prescriptions “with unlimited refills each.”

Board member Chuck Skillings said cases such as Dickinson's serve to erode the public's trust in the medical profession.

When it was announced that Dickinson would receive community service and a written reprimand for his actions, Skillings commented that the doctor “got off light.”


by Andrew Knittle
Investigative Reporter
Andrew Knittle has covered state water issues, tribal concerns and major criminal proceedings during his career as an Oklahoma journalist. He has won reporting awards from the state's Associated Press bureau and prides himself on finding a real...
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