Enid gets wild, woolly during yarn art event

“Yarnover Enid” aims to strengthen community ties one stitch at a time
by Nasreen Iqbal Modified: September 6, 2013 at 9:40 pm •  Published: September 7, 2013
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If Enid could burst at its seams, it might happen this weekend, as mountains of colorful yarn lines city sidewalks, pours out of local restaurants and hangs from fences, streetlights and stop signs.

The fiber art decorations are part of “Yarnover Enid,” the first community outreach program designed to bring business owners, residents and community leaders together by “stitching the strip” with yarn along Main Street.

“We wanted to do something to celebrate the community and the strides that we've made in the last couple of years,” founder Paula Nightengale said. “I thought, if you're going to weave a community together, why not use yarn?”

More than 1,500 colorful pieces of knitted and crocheted art will be available for viewing by residents and visitors until October, Nightengale said.

The works come from Park Avenue Thrift Store, a nonprofit and fair share United Way employer that Nightengale and David Hume operate.

After noticing the large amount of yarn being donated to the thrift store, Nightengale banded together with 35 other women who call themselves the Prairie Yarn Stormers.

The Stormers worked on their own creations and completed unfinished knitting and crocheting projects that had been donated to the store to provide the pieces for Yarnover Enid.

This year, the store reached $1 million in revenue since opening in 2007.

All store profits go to supporting community endeavors, Hume said. Recipients include Enid Symphony Orchestra, Gaslight Theatre, Enid's Toys for Tots and Shop with a Cop programs and Pegasys, a public educational and government access TV station.


by Nasreen Iqbal
Reporter
Nasreen Iqbal is a graduate of the Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas. She writes about news and events that occur within the Oklahoma City Metropolitan area.
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