Share “Even with the Lexington-Purcell bridge...”

Even with the Lexington-Purcell bridge open, Oklahoma farmers find it unusable

Farmers in Lexington say even though the James C. Nance Memorial Bridge, which was closed temporarily earlier this year, has reopened, the new weight restrictions keep them from using it costing them time and money.
by Graham Lee Brewer Modified: August 30, 2014 at 9:00 am •  Published: August 30, 2014


photo - 
Top: Jerry Moffat works one of his fields Thursday north of Lexington. He and other local farmers say they cannot use the bridge connecting them to Purcell because of new weight restrictions. Photos by 
David McDaniel, 
The Oklahoman
  David McDaniel -
Top: Jerry Moffat works one of his fields Thursday north of Lexington. He and other local farmers say they cannot use the bridge connecting them to Purcell because of new weight restrictions. Photos by David McDaniel, The Oklahoman David McDaniel -

— Farmers who use the bridge linking Lexington and Purcell to haul their goods say they can’t use it now because of new weight limitations.

The James C. Nance Memorial Bridge was closed Jan. 31 after state officials discovered the truss system was cracked and needed emergency repairs. After more than $20 million was spent to make it safe for public use, the bridge reopened in June.

State Transportation Department officials, however, imposed new weight restrictions because of concerns about its structural integrity.

Previously, the bridge had a standard 40-ton weight limit, but a sign posted now puts the weight limit at 36 tons.

Farmers say that won’t accommodate the trucks they use.

“For every load of grain we go out with, it’s taking the driver or whoever is driving that truck an extra hour to go through Norman and come back,” said Jerry Moffat, who farms wheat and corn.

Moffat, 46, said his drivers have to go north through Norman and back down Interstate 35 to Maysville. A trip that used to be 36 miles there and back is now more than 100 miles.

Transportation officials promised farmers the bridge would be back to its originally capacity, Moffat said.

“I understand if it’s a safety issue, which it obviously is now, but my point is when we had the crew there working on the bridge, how come we stopped repairing it?”

Casey Shell, chief engineer for the Transportation Department, said the plan was to get the bridge back to full capacity, but additional damage was discovered during the repair process that made that plan unfeasible.

It was in the best interest of public safety to lower the weight limit, Shell said.

He compared the state of the bridge to an old wheat truck.

“It’s old and it’s tired, and it’s had a problem,” he said. “So, they may have to put a transmission in the old truck and they do. But, when they go back to using it with the new transmission, it still has an old engine, it’s got bad breaks, it’s got all the other problems, but they got enough good back in it to put it back into use. You can’t afford, and we couldn’t afford on this bridge, to go fix everything that’s wrong with it.”

Continue reading this story on the...

by Graham Lee Brewer
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Graham Lee Brewer began his career as a journalist covering Oklahoma's vibrant music scene in 2006. After working as a public radio reporter for KGOU and then Oklahoma Watch, where he covered areas such as immigration and drug addiction, he went...
+ show more


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Former Oklahoma State QB Daxx Garman transferring to Maryland
  2. 2
    High Schoolers Donate Class Trip Money To Principal Battling Cancer
  3. 3
    Chiropractor who practiced in OKC admits to $2M real estate scam
  4. 4
    Everett Golson says Notre Dame blocked him from transferring to Texas
  5. 5
    SeaWorld in Orlando to build monster roller coaster
+ show more