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Expecto equality: Harry Potter and the spell of reduced prejudice

A new study has found that kids who read Harry Potter books were more likely to not harbor prejudice against LGBT and immigrant communities.
Chandra Johnson, Deseret News Modified: August 1, 2014 at 8:33 pm •  Published: August 4, 2014
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A new study published this week in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology claims that kids who read J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series were more likely to have "improved attitudes" about minority groups.

British and Italian elementary students were asked to read the books as part of a focus on prejudice and researchers found that afterward, students who discussed the theme of oppression in the books developed a positive perspective for victims of prejudice.

But is the boy who lived the real reason behind the change? The Pacific Standard praised the study, but also cited its own study from March, which found that reading any kind of literary fiction can help reduce racism "by helping readers identify with characters from diverse backgrounds."

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