Expert defends Arias diagnosis of PTSD, amnesia

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 25, 2013 at 7:32 pm •  Published: March 25, 2013
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"I can respond in terms of psychological probability," Samuels explained.

"Which is basically telling me you don't know," Martinez snapped.

Throughout the often redundant questioning of Samuels, some jurors appeared to be growing bored of his explanations and Martinez's repeated queries that treaded the same ground as his testimony over his previous five days on the stand.

One panelist rested his head in his hands, while another bent over and picked at his fingers. Some jurors yawned and leaned back in their chairs, appearing to take less notes than during previous days. One looked at his watch repeatedly.

Arias, meanwhile, appeared to pay close attention to the testimony, watching the often contentious interaction between Martinez and Samuels without much emotion.

The defense then called its next witness, a psychotherapist who specializes in domestic violence. Alyce LaViolette spent the remainder of the day explaining her background and expertise to jurors. She is set to resume testimony on Tuesday.

Alexander suffered nearly 30 knife wounds, was shot in the head and had his throat slit. Arias' palm print was found in blood at the scene, along with her hair and nude photos of her and the victim from the day of the killing.

Arias said she recalls Alexander attacking her in a fury after a day of sex. She said she ran into his closet to retrieve a gun he kept on a shelf and fired in self-defense but has no memory of stabbing him.

She acknowledged trying to clean the scene, dumping the gun in the desert and working on an alibi to avoid suspicion. She said she was too scared and ashamed to tell the truth at the time but insists she isn't lying now.

None of Arias' allegations of Alexander's previous physical abuse, that he owned a gun and had sexual desires for boys has been corroborated during the trial that began in early January.