Extension sought for public comment on Oklahoma City's new boulevard

Friends for a Better Boulevard, an advocacy group formed to promote a pedestrian and bicycle friendly downtown boulevard, is asking the Oklahoma Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration to extend a public comment period on the project that ended Tuesday.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: May 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm •  Published: May 20, 2014
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Friends for a Better Boulevard, an advocacy group formed to promote a pedestrian and bicycle friendly downtown boulevard, is asking the Oklahoma Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration to extend a public comment period on the project. The comment period ended Tuesday.

Bob Kemper, the group’s founder, said extending the two-week review will allow for more public discussion and scrutiny of the boulevard designs and better ensure the best project moves forward. State highway engineers also hosted an “open house” at the Cox Convention Center on May 7, two hours before a Thunder play-off game started across the street at the Chesapeake Energy Arena.

“The time was just too short,” Kemper said. While Kemper doesn’t believe there was any malicious intent since there was no way to know that a playoff game would be scheduled the same night, “everyone agrees the comment period was too short.”

Developers and real estate professionals have told The Oklahoman the boulevard’s design can either boost or kill development chances for a large blighted area between the new roadway, Interstate 40, Western and Walker Avenues known as part of Core to Shore.

The area includes a collection of decades-old buildings deemed by developers to be architecturally significant.

Kemper said as of Tuesday he had not received a response to the extension request letters sent to the agencies last week. Transportation officials declined comment to The Oklahoman about the request, saying it had not yet been received.

In prior interviews, they indicated they believed the review process was sufficient.

“Our public comment periods are typically 14 days, as approved by the Federal Highway Administration,” state Transportation Department spokesman Cole Hackett said.

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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