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'Face Off' finalists face the music in live season finale

Contestant challenges this season have involved “Star Wars,” pirates and characters inspired by unusual cars.
By Jay Bobbin Published: October 31, 2012
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If any competitive reality series merits a Halloween season finale, it's “Face Off.”

The Syfy program is all about horror makeup, so the traditional night for macabre disguises couldn't be better timing for the show's Season 3 winner to be declared. More is involved, since host McKenzie Westmore — who hails from a legendary family of Hollywood makeup artists — will preside over the finale live for the first time at 8 p.m. Wednesday. And in another first, viewers can decide who wins by voting after the previous night's episode.

“Face Off” has redefined the television image of Westmore, previously best-known as heroine Sheridan Crane Lopez-Fitzgerald on the now-defunct NBC daytime serial “Passions.” Unlike the first two “Face Off” seasons, she's had a break between the weekly episodes and the finale, which she deems “really interesting. We'll see how things have progressed for the people, and I'm so curious to see who America chooses.”

Contestant challenges this season have involved “Star Wars,” pirates and characters inspired by unusual cars.

“As with every show on television, you have to find new, inventive ways to keep hooking the viewer back in,” the friendly, energetic Westmore says, “ways to go bigger and broader. I think that's what's such a cool thing about what we're doing; it's a way for us to involve the viewer more. Syfy and Mission Control (the studio behind ‘Face Off') are so much about the fans. They're truly listening to what they have to say and think.”

Because of that, Westmore is convinced the selection of the Season 3 “Face Off” winner “will go beyond just a popularity contest. I see it on my Twitter feed all the time: The fans of Syfy really do have their own opinions on the artistic value of what they're seeing in the makeup. It's not just, ‘Oh, I really like that person.' Granted, they're not seeing in person all the stuff we're seeing, but we're essentially asking America whether it's camera-ready.”