Facts about upcoming EU member Croatia

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 30, 2013 at 8:23 am •  Published: June 30, 2013
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ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) — Croatia formally becomes the 28th member of the European Union on Monday, the bloc's first addition since Bulgaria and Romania joined in 2007. Croatia is becoming a member after a decade of negotiation, and marks a historic turning point for the country which went through a civil war after declaring independence from the former Yugoslavia in 1991.

WHAT DOES CROATIA HOPE TO GAIN WITH EU ENTRY?

— Some 11.7 billion euros ($15.2 billion) in EU investment funds promised over the next seven years, if the Croats can devise acceptable programs for their use. Access to the much larger EU markets. Possibility of finding jobs in some EU states, although many have already established restrictions for Croatian citizens. Less expensive study opportunities for Croatian students in EU schools and universities.

WHAT IS THE EU GETTING FROM CROATIA'S ENTRY?

— More stability in the Balkans. A slightly larger market for EU goods. Less hassle at the borders for EU citizens traveling to Croatia. Easier and less bureaucratic purchase of property by EU citizens in Croatia.

FACTS ABOUT CROATIA

— The horseshoe-shaped country is in the Balkan peninsula, along the Adriatic coast. The country has 4.2 million people, mostly Roman Catholics, and is considered one of the most Catholic nations in Europe. It borders Bosnia, Serbia, Hungary Slovenia, Italy and Montenegro. Serbs, who are Orthodox Christians, are the biggest minority.

HISTORY

— Croatia declared independence from Yugoslavia 22 years ago. It was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire, before joining a union with Serbia and Slovenia in 1918, under the rule of a Serbian royal family. This country broke up in World War II with German occupation, when Croatia became a Nazi puppet state; tens of thousands of Jews, Serbs and anti-fascist Croats were killed in concentration camps. After the war Croatia became part of communist-led Yugoslavia, which broke up in the early 1990s' in a civil war.

STATEHOOD

— Croatia declared independence in 1991, triggering a rebellion by minority Croatian Serbs and an onslaught by the Serb-led Yugoslav army. About a third of the country's territory was occupied by the Serbs, and many areas were reduced to rubble before a U.N. peacekeeping force moved in. The war ended in 1995, when Croatia retook territories in an offensive.

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