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FDA: Georgia plant waited to disclose salmonella

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 7, 2014 at 3:43 pm •  Published: August 7, 2014
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ALBANY, Ga. (AP) — Officers at a Georgia peanut plant took five days to disclose that lab tests found salmonella in some of their products, despite repeated questioning from on-site inspectors rushing to find the source of a deadly national outbreak, a federal investigator testified Thursday.

Food and Drug Administration inspectors arrived at the Peanut Corp. of America plant in rural Blakely on Jan. 9, 2009, after tubs of salmonella-tainted peanut butter were traced to the factory. Now the company's former owner and two others are standing trial in U.S. District Court in a rare instance of corporate officers and workers being prosecuted in a food poisoning case.

Bob Neligan, an FDA food safety investigator, told the jury Thursday the plant's manager told inspectors during their first day at the plant that the only time salmonella had been detected during routine lab tests on the company's products had turned out to be a false positive. The same manager, Samuel Lightsey, changed his story a few days later, he said.

"It was finally on day five that Mr. Lightsey revealed they had had three positives for salmonella, and that would have been in the last year or so," Neligan said. "We had continuously asked that from day one."

By the end of January, after the FDA took the unusual step of issuing Peanut Corp. a mandatory order to turn over two years of records, inspectors found lab tests had confirmed salmonella in 12 lots of ground peanuts, peanut paste and peanut butter produced at the Georgia plant since 2007. He said most companies linked to food-borne illnesses voluntarily "hand over as many records as they can to resolve the issue quickly."

Neligan said other company officers who asked about salmonella before the tests were disclosed included Peanut Corp. owner and president Stewart Parnell and the plant's quality assurance manager, Mary Wilkerson. Parnell has been charged with shipping contaminated food to customers and with covering up positive lab tests for salmonella, as has his brother, food broker Michael Parnell. Stewart Parnell and Wilkerson are also charged with obstruction of justice by withholding information from investigators. Conspiracy and obstruction charges brought against the defendants in a 76-count indictment last year each carry a maximum sentence of 20 years.

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