Feds: Ruptured W.Va. pipe may have been corroded

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 14, 2012 at 7:11 pm •  Published: December 14, 2012
Advertisement
;

"What they told us what was in the ground was not actually what was in the ground," Sumwalt said. "So even though we've been provided those (Columbia Gas Transmission) records, we need to verify that."

Investigators have said alarms didn't sound at Columbia Gas Transmission's Charleston control room during the explosion.

A Columbia Gas control room worker first learned about the accident from another company, Sumwalt said. The worker received a call 10 minutes after the blast from a controller at Cabot Gas, who had been contacted by someone on the outside.

The NTSB plans to interview the Cabot Gas employee and attempt to locate the outside caller, Sumwalt said.

Earlier Friday, Columbia Gas Transmission chief executive Jimmy Staton released an open letter to the community saying the company is committed to helping investigators pinpoint the cause of the explosion and ensure the pipeline is safe.



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    'Glee' star Becca Tobin's boyfriend Matt Bendik found dead in Philadelphia hotel room
  2. 2
    Oklahoma City Thunder: Kevin Durant reportedly trying to get Caron Butler to return
  3. 3
    Isolated Amazon Tribe Makes First Contact
  4. 4
    911 Dispatcher Handles Call About Her Choking Son
  5. 5
    Cops: Woman Faked Drowning to Avoid Court
+ show more