Fire drill: Cushing crews test equipment for fighting oil tank fires

The Cushing Fire Department on Tuesday tested specialized equipment needed to quickly and safely extinguish a fire at one of the thousands of storage tanks throughout Cushing that collectively hold billions of dollars worth of crude.
by Adam Wilmoth Modified: August 28, 2013 at 7:00 pm •  Published: August 27, 2013

CUSHING — Powerful water cannons set up on the northern Oklahoma prairie could be the best defense against a costly fire at one of the country's busiest and richest oil terminals.

The Cushing Fire Department on Tuesday tested specialized equipment needed to quickly and safely extinguish a fire at one of the thousands of storage tanks throughout Cushing that collectively hold billions of dollars worth of crude.

“This is a skill we don't get to train on continuously throughout the year like we do with a structure fire or vehicle accident,” Cushing Fire Chief Chris Pixler said. “Any skill you've been trained on, if you don't use it, you lose it. It's important anytime we get an opportunity to come out into the field and do a full-scale scenario such as this that we do it and keep those skills fresh.”

The fire department worked with several of the 14 oil companies in the area for the exercise.

Crews used four pumps that each sucked at least 6,000 gallons of water per minute out of nearby ponds before mixing the water with foam and launching it at a decommissioned Enbridge storage tank.

At the same time, other crews hauled hoses up the steep stairs along the outside of the storage tank and poured foam directly into the massive container.

The test took place at the Enbridge Inc. storage yard with equipment from both Enbridge and Gavilon Midstream Energy.

“These kinds of hands-on experiences using the specialized equipment they may not be as familiar with can provide valuable experience for everyone involved,” Enbridge spokeswoman Lara Burhenn said.

The oil companies are all required to have a plan for putting out tank fires.

But just having a plan is not enough, said Charles Wolfe, director of environmental safety at Deeprock Energy Resources in Cushing.


by Adam Wilmoth
Energy Editor
Adam Wilmoth returned to The Oklahoman as energy editor in 2012 after working for four years in public relations. He previously spent seven years as a business reporter at The Oklahoman, including five years covering the state's energy sector....
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