For Oklahoma lawmakers, less said about corrections the better

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board Published: February 19, 2013
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Jones figures he needs about $3 million to hire the number of parole and probation officers it would take to handle the increased workload. As it is, pardon and parole officers are inundated. Note an example in Tulsa, where a man now accused of being involved with killing four women was one of 150 cases handled by a parole officer. The process of determining whether the man's parole should be revoked after his conviction on a misdemeanor took two months, during which time the murders were committed.

Even if the Justice Reinvestment Act were funded, the prison population would still grow, but at a slower pace. Lawmakers, Jones said, “don't want to hear that we're growing.”

Indeed most prefer not to hear much of anything about corrections, except that we're putting away bad guys and keeping them locked up as long as possible.


by The Oklahoman Editorial Board
The Oklahoman Editorial Board consists of Gary Pierson, President and CEO of The Oklahoma Publishing Company; Christopher P. Reen, president and publisher of The Oklahoman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor and vice president of news; Christy Gaylord...
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