Forgotten Oklahoma cemetery contains grave of woman who walked Trail of Tears

On Saturday about 60 members of the Trail of Tears — Oklahoma Chapter honored Electa Crittenden. At the base of her tombstone is a bronze plaque engraved with the words “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-1839.”
By Sheila Stogsdill Modified: May 7, 2012 at 10:53 am •  Published: May 6, 2012
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A young Cherokee woman who as a child walked the infamous Trail of Tears path to Oklahoman and was buried nearly 133 years ago in a forgotten cemetery located in the middle of Grove was honored on Saturday.

Once thought to be an abandoned cemetery that is located on top of a hill near the community's city offices is the tombstone of Electa Crittenden.

“The majority (of Grove residents) didn't know the graveyard was here,” said Don Meints, a Grand Lake realtor.

For nearly 60 years, the four-plot cemetery was hidden behind an old shed among entangled brush and vines.

“It was about seven years ago the tombstones were discovered and a red flag went up,” Meints said.

The old shed has since been tore down and hauled away, the weeds and brush removed and the grassy lot is now mowed on a regular schedule.

Underneath a 40-foot tall hickory tree are three grave markers. The marker with legible engraving belongs to Crittenden.

According to the grave marker, she was born Dec. 25, 1835 and died Jan. 20, 1879, almost 28 years before statehood. At the time of Crittenden's death, Grove, referred to as Grove Springs, was more of a watering hole for travelers.

Engraved on Crittenden's tombstone are the words, “Her gentle ways will ever dwell in hearts of those who knew and loved her well.”

On Saturday about 60 members of the Trail of Tears — Oklahoma Chapter honored Electa Crittenden. At the base of her tombstone is a bronze plaque engraved with the words “In honor of one who endured the forced removal of the Cherokees in 1838-1839.”

“This is holy ground,” said Billie Napolitano. “No one can come in and move this cemetery.”

“We think her 2-year-old son is also buried here,” said Cara Cowan Watts, Cherokee Nation Tribal Councilwoman.

As a 3-year-old child, Crittenden endured the forced removal from Tennessee to what is now Adair County, said Carol Savage. She later married Henry Crittenden and they moved to Delaware County where they had five children, she said.

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