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Former Bethany police officer ordered to stand trial on larceny charges

Former police Capt. Jack Jencks, 47, is accused of removing dozens of pills from envelopes containing police evidence.
by Graham Lee Brewer Modified: May 23, 2014 at 9:17 pm •  Published: May 24, 2014
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A former Bethany police officer should go to trial on charges of stealing prescription drugs from police evidence, an Oklahoma County judge ruled Friday.

Former police Capt. Jack Jencks, 47, is accused of removing dozens of pills from envelopes containing police evidence scheduled to be destroyed by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation.

Special Judge Larry Jones noted Friday in his decision that much of the evidence against Jencks is circumstantial. However, evidence put forth by the state shows Jencks had both intimate knowledge of the evidence-keeping process and ample access to the drugs, the judge said.

Jencks was charged in February with 10 felony counts of larceny of a controlled dangerous substance. An additional count was added Wednesday, during the second day in his preliminary hearing.

Court records show Jencks was the last person to handle the evidence in all 11 cases where pills went missing. He told investigators that he was responsible for submitting evidence to the OSBI lab, for both destruction and testing, and taking it to the police property room.

The state asserts after the drugs were tested by OSBI and returned to the Bethany Police Department, Jencks removed the pills, in one case replacing them with screws to mimic the sound and feel of the drugs, and then marked the envelopes for destruction.

Defense attorney Michael Johnson pointed out during Wednesday’s hearing that aside from the other two officers who had access to the Bethany Police evidence locker, fingerprints from two additional officers were found inside some of the envelopes and at least 25 OSBI agents also had access to the evidence envelopes.

“I find it amazing that officer’s fingerprints are found in bags inside evidence envelopes that are torn open that have nothing to do with the case, and yet aren’t even investigated or talked to,” Johnson said Friday after the judge’s decision.

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by Graham Lee Brewer
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Graham Lee Brewer began his career as a journalist covering Oklahoma's vibrant music scene in 2006. After working as a public radio reporter for KGOU and then Oklahoma Watch he went on to cover the Oklahoma Senate for eCapitol before joining the...
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