Friday Night Lights: Moore War is about unity this year

The massive tornado of May 20 caused horrific death and destruction in the Moore area, and left the community searching for a way to make life seem normal again. Fifteen weeks later, maybe this can bring some solace: high school football season has begun.
by Scott Wright Published: September 5, 2013

— Tommy Noles was browsing around a sporting goods store a few days ago when he ran into an old friend.

Noles, now retired, was a longtime football coach at Moore High School. His friend had been a coach at Westmoore, and they both still live in the area.

They chatted about life and football and family. And like many conversations around Moore over the last three months, the discussion turned more serious.

“It always leads to, ‘Well, did your family survive the storm? Did you have any damage?'” Noles said, referring to the tornadoes that ravaged Moore and other Oklahoma towns in May. “It's been a topic of conversation for three months, and it'll continue on.”

The massive tornado of May 20 caused horrific death and destruction in the Moore area, and left the community searching for a way to make life seem normal again.

Fifteen weeks later, maybe this can bring some solace: high school football season has begun.

And in September, Friday nights watching football at Moore Stadium are as normal as life gets.

The season began with Carl Albert vs. Southmoore on Thursday night, and then, Moore's classic rivalry game — Moore High vs. Westmoore in the Moore War — will kick off at 7 p.m. Friday.

Two decades ago, the Moore War was the state's premier big-school rivalry game. It was Jenks vs. Tulsa Union before those two schools redefined what a high-school football rivalry was.

Former coach Carl Franks, who now serves as the district-wide athletic director for Moore schools, remembers coaching in front of as many as 15,000 fans during the peak of the series, when both teams were expected to — and often did — go deep into the playoffs and play for state titles.

“At its height, it was probably the biggest rivalry game in Oklahoma, as far as attendance and all of that,” Noles said. “The Moore War had become quite an extravaganza, so to speak. Every year, in our preparation for that game, I told our kids that there were thousands of kids and hundreds of coaches who would love the opportunity to participate in it, because it was so much fun.”

The game itself has slipped in stature a little, partly because other rivalry games have grown, and partly because Moore and Westmoore aren't the powerhouse programs they once were.

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by Scott Wright
Reporter
A lifelong resident of the Oklahoma City metro area, Scott Wright has been on The Oklahoman staff since 2005, covering a little bit of everything on the state's sports scene. He has been a beat writer for football and basketball at Oklahoma and...
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