Future home address: 204 N Robinson, 33rd floor, Oklahoma City

BY RICHARD MIZE Published: May 2, 2009
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photo - Michael Nichols of Specialty Construction Services and Ran Oliver show space on the 31st floor of City Place that is being converted to living space. Photo by Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman
Michael Nichols of Specialty Construction Services and Ran Oliver show space on the 31st floor of City Place that is being converted to living space. Photo by Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman
Call it "six in the city” — and a literal spin on what it means to live the high life.

Consider life on the 33rd floor, in one of only a half dozen condominiums towering above the core of downtown Oklahoma City.

It’s in the works for City Place, the Depression-era skyscraper at 204 N Robinson Ave.

The top seven floors of the office building are being converted to residential use — but only six condos, whose residents will have access to indoor parking on the ground floor.

Owner Roy T. Oliver doesn’t plan to compete with other downtown living options. He plans to dominate one niche: the skyscraper life.

"There are no residences on the 33rd floor downtown now. There will be in the near future. This will certainly be the most unusual residence downtown. It’s one of a kind,” he said.

Make that the 32nd and 33rd floors, which will be sold as one condo connected by an Art Deco stairway, which seems natural since the elevators go only to the 32nd floor.

By renovating City Place, which he bought last fall, Oliver is building up his own neighborhood. His property holdings include Leadership Square across the street at 211 N Robinson; Oklahoma Tower around the corner at 210 Park Ave.; and Corporate Tower, catty-corner to City Place at 101 N Robinson.



At a glance
City Place’s place in history

Roy T. Oliver said it was the history embedded in the architecture of 78-year-old City Place and the building’s place in Oklahoma City’s oil-boom heritage that led him to buy the building last fall.

Originally called Ramsey Tower for oilman W.R. Ramsey, who financed it, the building went up in a "skyscraper race” with First National Center, on the next block south at 120 N Robinson.

The buff-brick exterior, with its vertical bay windows, numerous architectural setbacks — the higher the floor, the smaller the floor plate — and use of darker spandrel brick, said "stability” in 1931, when construction trends were pushing office buildings higher than some people’s comfort levels.

It was quite a sight for Oklahoma City, still young at 42.

"It wasn’t six blocks from that building, it was pastureland,” Oliver said.

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