Gardening: New year is time for reviewing garden practices

Rodd Moesel advises readers about gardening and horticultural topics.
By Rodd Moesel, For The Oklahoman Published: December 31, 2012
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We have apparently passed the end date of the ancient Mayan calendar, and tonight we pass the end date on our modern 2012 calendar and start the New Year 2013.

This end-of-one-year-start-of-a-new-year time period is one where we usually pause to reflect on the year that is winding down and ponder dreams and goals for the year ahead.

We are even tempted to ponder our life's accomplishments, disappointments, challenges and to plan for any midcourse corrections to get where we want to go.

We can benefit from the same year-end review and planning when it comes to our gardening and landscape activities.

Regardless of the calendar change to a new year this is the perfect season to do our gardening or farming reviews and planning. It is the coldest season of the year with short days when we are between crop seasons.

Most of the plant world is dormant or in hibernation, curled up for the winter and waiting for the invitation of spring.

Farmers have their winter wheat and gardeners have their evergreen trees and shrubs, pansies and a few other hardy crops, but most of the plant world is hiding for the winter, trying to avoid the ice, snow and cold like those experienced this last week.

Since we are in a drought, these winter crops do need periodic watering to survive the Oklahoma winter.

You still could make late plantings of spring flowering bulbs or dig some new flower beds but, for the most part, this is the season to stay inside and enjoy pictures and memories of gardens past and to dream and plan for gardens future.

The past several years have seen an explosion of new gardeners — particularly vegetable, fruit and berry gardeners — as more people have tackled growing some of their own food crops.

This has been one part of the whole “grow local” movement that has led to many new local farmers markets and new growers to serve those markets.

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