German court ends Ecclestone bribery trial

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 5, 2014 at 11:42 am •  Published: August 5, 2014
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Bernie Ecclestone is free to concentrate on running Formula One after a German court dropped a bribery case against him Tuesday in exchange for a $100 million payment.

After hearing more than three months of evidence, the Munich state court cited significant doubts that Ecclestone could be convicted on charges of bribery and incitement to breach of trust as it approved an agreement between his lawyers and prosecutors and closed the trial.

The charges can carry a sentence of up to 10 years in prison, and a conviction would have threatened Ecclestone's grip on the global racing series. The 83-year-old Englishman has continued running F1 while spending two days a week in a Munich courtroom.

"Bye-bye," Ecclestone said to reporters as he left the court, adding that he was off "to take care of Formula One."

Later, Ecclestone said he was "a bit of an idiot" for agreeing to the huge settlement as he believes he would probably have been acquitted had the trial continued.

"Anyway, it's done and finished, so it's all right," he told Britain's Press Association. "I'm contented. It's all fine. This now allows me to do what I do best, which is running F1."

The charges involved a $44 million payment to German banker Gerhard Gribkowsky, who is serving an 8 1/2-year sentence for taking the money. Gribkowsky was convicted of corruption, tax evasion and breach of trust in a trial led by the same judge who heard Ecclestone's case, Peter Noll.

Ecclestone denied wrongdoing and said Gribkowsky, who was in charge of selling German bank BayernLB's 47 percent stake in F1 in 2005, blackmailed him.

After hearing evidence since late April, "the court did not consider a conviction overwhelmingly likely," court spokeswoman Andrea Titz said.

"There was no conclusion on guilt or innocence of the defendant," she said. "He is leaving this courtroom a free man."

Prosecutors alleged that the payment to Gribkowsky was meant to facilitate the sale of Munich-based bank Bayern LB's stake in F1 to a buyer of Ecclestone's liking. However, the court noted in Tuesday's decision that witness testimony suggested that the sale of the stake to CVC Capital Partners was "an unexpectedly profitable deal" for the bank.

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