Get App-y: Wearing Google Glass in the first days

The Oklahoman's Lillie-Beth Brinkman is among the first in the U.S. to pick up the new technology.
by Lillie-Beth Brinkman Modified: June 20, 2013 at 9:12 am •  Published: June 18, 2013

Google Glass is a new technology that puts many of the tools we use on our smartphones today in a small square-shaped “prism” that rests above your eye.

Being a part of the early adopter group in the U.S. to have this technology, I've been wearing Google Glass for two days. After wearing Google Glass from California, where I picked it up, and back to Oklahoma, I've realized that people have lots of questions and thoughts about the new device that looks like glasses and brings computing to your forehead.

People who have seen me wearing Glass were intrigued, amazed and saw a lot of potential in the device with a heads-up display. However, others have raised concerns about privacy, tech distractions and the dangers of using it while doing other things, like driving.

I've had questions from a woman who took my order in the McDonald's drive-thru window, people behind the counter at the airport shop, air travelers, people at work and others, all who want to know more about the device that until now they had only read about because it has not yet been released for sale to the general public:

“Is that Google Glass?”

“What does it do?” “How does it work?”

“Does it work with prescription glasses?”

“That is one of the neatest things I've seen.”

“Wow! I can't wait to show friends I tried on Glass.”

“This is the future.”

Svetlana Saitsky, who works for Google demonstrating Glass to the early “Explorers,” has the perfect answer to the “future” statement when she hears it:

“Actually, it's the present. You're missing the fact that it's right here,” said the 27-year-old, whose enthusiasm for the device and its potential is catching. “I love to tell people that.”

The early Explorers are either developers or those who were selected via a social media contest to try out the device before it goes on the market, which is how I was eligible to buy a pair. The beta-version of Glass retailed for $1,500 to the Explorers, but most people in the tech industry that I talked to said they expect the price to come down before it is released to the public.

After being selected through the contest, I found myself in Mountain View last weekend, drinking Champagne at Google headquarters with my dad to toast the experience and listening to Saitsky show me how it works.

Glass rests on your forehead like glasses, but it includes a clear prism that rests above your eye and acts as a projector for information. On the prism, you can see photos, videos taken by the device, information from Google, texts, incoming calls, posts that mention you from connected Twitter feeds, the weather and other “Glassware,” which is what applications are called that people will develop specifically for the device. Many of the apps we've grown accustomed to on our smartphones are not yet on Glass.

Saitsky explained to me when I picked up Glass that Google's intention for the device was to make it “Simple. Human. Now.” Those words, she noted, encompass Google's lofty goal to get people away from hunching over their cellphones, tapping, and back into the real world, interacting and connecting with each other. It's still too early to tell whether that's what how the general public will use Glass.

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by Lillie-Beth Brinkman
Lillie-Beth Brinkman is a Content Marketing Manager for the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. She was previously an assistant editor of The Oklahoman
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