Share “Google's 1Q earnings disappoint as ad...”

Google's 1Q earnings disappoint as ad prices slip

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 16, 2014 at 5:32 pm •  Published: April 16, 2014
Advertisement

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google's first-quarter earnings growth faltered as the Internet's most influential company grappled with a persistent downturn in advertising prices while spending more money to hire employees and invest in daring ideas.

The results announced Wednesday fell below analyst projections. Google's Class A stock shed $17.10, or 3 percent, to $546.80 in extended trading.

Although it remains among the world's most profitable companies, Google Inc. is struggling to adjust to a shift away from desktop and laptop computers to smartphones and tablets. The upheaval is lowering Google's ad rates because so far marketers haven't been willing to pay as much to pitch consumers who are squinting at the smaller screens on mobile devices.

Google earned $3.45 billion, or $5.04 per share, in the quarter. That was up 3 percent from $3.3 billion, or $4.97 per share, last year.

If not for costs covering employee stock compensation and other one-time items, Google said it would have earned $6.27 per share. That figure missed the average analyst target of $6.36 per share, according to FactSet.

Revenue rose 19 percent from last year to $15.4 billion.

After subtracting advertising commissions, Google's revenue stood at $12.2 billion — about $200 million below analyst projections.

Google's average rate for ads appearing alongside its search results fell 9 percent from last year. It marked the 10th consecutive quarter that the company's "cost-per-click" has declined from the previous year.

The erosion would have hurt Google even more if people hadn't been clicking on ads more frequently. The volume of activity is important because Google bills advertisers when people click on a promotional link. Google's paid clicks during the first quarter climbed 26 percent from last year.

As its ad prices sagged, Google's operating expenses shot up 31 percent from last year to $5.3 billion. The rise included the addition of about 2,300 Google employees, the biggest three-month rise in the company's workforce since buying Motorola Mobility for $12.4 billion nearly two years ago. Excluding the Motorola deal, it was the largest quarterly increase in Google's total employees since the summer of 2011 when an additional 2,500 people joined the company.

Continue reading this story on the...