Green family, Hobby Lobby, connected for 40 years

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 30, 2014 at 5:03 pm •  Published: June 30, 2014
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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Monday's Supreme Court ruling that the Hobby Lobby crafts store chain does not have to provide all forms of birth control marks the first time the high court has said some businesses can hold religious views under federal law, in cases where there is essentially no difference between the business and its owners. Here's a look at Hobby Lobby's owners, the Green family of Oklahoma City.

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A FAMILY AFFAIR: David Green in 1972 expanded a picture frame company started two years earlier and named the new business Hobby Lobby. Green is the privately held company's chief executive officer and his son, Steve, is its president. In 1981, another son, Mart, founded the Mardel bookstore chain, which concentrates on religious material. Mardel also was a part of the lawsuit decided Monday.

Hobby Lobby and Mardel include mission statements on their corporate websites outlining a dedication to Christian principles.

Hobby Lobby says it aims to honor the Lord by following biblical principles; establish a work environment that builds character, strengthens individuals and nurtures families and provides a return on its owner's investment so he can share the Lord's blessings with its 13,000 employees. Mardel was established "for the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ," quoting St. Paul's letter to the Ephesians.

No Hobby Lobby store is open on Sunday "in order to allow our employees and customers more time for worship and family."

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A NATION IN DANGER: Steve Green is a driving force behind the proposed Museum of the Bible and the Green Scholars Initiative, which intend to place a Bible-based academic curriculum with the nation's public schools.

"This nation is in danger because of its ignorance of what God has taught," Steve Green told the National Bible Association last year. "There are lessons from the past that we can learn from, the dangers of ignorance of this book. We need to know it, and if we don't know it, our future is going to be very scary."

Green, a member of the Council Road Baptist Church in Bethany, Oklahoma, has succeeded in convincing the Mustang, Oklahoma, school board to offer the curriculum as an elective this fall. Course work will include how biblical principals have influenced art and academic subjects, but a draft copy of the textbook also details the consequences people face if they disobey God.

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