Hanyu wins men's Olympic gold, Chan 2nd, Ten 3rd

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 14, 2014 at 3:55 pm •  Published: February 14, 2014
Advertisement
;

SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Sometimes an Olympic gold medalist is more survivor than anything else.

Yuzuru Hanyu knows the feeling.

Not only did Hanyu make it difficult on himself, he thought he lost all chance at the title Friday night with a mediocre free skate at the Sochi Olympics. Instead, thanks to the mistakes of Patrick Chan and others, Hanyu became Japan's first gold medalist in Olympic men's figure skating.

"Negative feelings were brewing inside of me," Hanyu said. "It was difficult to keep with the performance with all that in my head.

"I thought the gold medal was not in my hands."

It wound up there mainly because his nearly 4-point lead after the short program was enough to overcome his shortcomings in the long.

Also the first Asian man to win Olympic gold, Hanyu fell on his opening jump, a quad salchow, and crashed on his third, a triple flip. That left plenty of room for Canada's Chan to skate through to the top of the podium, but he made three errors in a watered-down program to finish second.

"I had that chance and it slipped out of my hands," Chan said.

Canada has never won the event, either.

Kazakhstan's Denis Ten, the world silver medalist, won bronze in Sochi in a final that was a two-man showdown between Hanyu, 19, and three-time world champion Chan, 23.

Few skaters performed close to their peak on a second consecutive night of competition. Most of them appeared fatigued, particularly at the end of their 4½-minute routines. It was one of the sloppiest men's Olympic programs in memory.

"I visualized this evening as one great skate after another," said Brian Orser, Hanyu's coach. "It kind of didn't happen. It was one of those things. Nobody got the momentum going."

Chan skated directly after Hanyu with a chance to do what such renowned Canadian men as Donald Jackson, Kurt Browning, Elvis Stojko and Orser could not. But he wasn't sharp either.

"We all had rough skates," Chan said. "These competitions are about who makes the least mistakes. I had one too many mistakes."

Just minutes before, when Hanyu finished, kneeling, he laid two hands on the ice for a long time, thinking he had blown it.

"I was so nervous and I was so tired," he said. "But I was surprised (to win). I was not happy with my program."

Orser told him not to fret, that the competition wasn't over. And when Chan came up short, the gold was headed to Japan.



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Sex Valley: Tech's booming prostitution trade
  2. 2
    Colorado Is Consuming Way More Pot Than Anyone Ever Believed
  3. 3
    What Dan Gilbert said to LeBron James to get him to return to Cleveland
  4. 4
    Female Yahoo Exec Sued By a Female Employee for Sexual Harassment
  5. 5
    A company wants you to experiment on Facebook — by quitting
+ show more