Health notes: Autism becoming more common

Oklahoman Published: January 5, 2010
Advertisement
;

/> A study published in the December issue of the journal Pediatrics found only 13.7 percent of child-care centers in North Carolina offered 120 minutes of active playtime during the school day.

Researchers at the university’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention observed and reviewed physical activity and playtime practices and policies in 96 centers across the state. An earlier study by the same group developed the 120-minute benchmark as part of best-practice guidelines for promoting healthy weight in young children.

However, the study also showed positive signs. In 82 percent of the centers, children were not sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time, and about 56 percent of centers had a written policy about physical activity.

Review finds electric therapy ineffective for chronic back pain
A new guideline issued by the American Academy of Neurology finds that transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, a widely used pain therapy involving a portable device, is not recommended to treat chronic low-back pain — pain that has persisted for three months or longer — because research shows it is not effective. The guideline is published in the Dec. 30 online issue of Neurology.

The guideline determined that the pain therapy can be effective in treating diabetic nerve pain, also called diabetic neuropathy, but more and better research is needed to compare it to other treatments for this type of pain.

Research on transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for chronic low-back pain has produced conflicting results.

For the guideline, the authors reviewed all of the evidence for low-back pain lasting three months or longer. Acute low-back pain was not studied. The studies to date show that the pain therapy does not help with chronic low-back pain.

The Associated Press