High school baseball: Silo coach under investigation

by Ed Godfrey and Ryan Aber and Scott Wright Published: April 16, 2013

A longtime Silo baseball coach has been accused of intentionally throwing baseballs at his junior high players as a way to discipline them.

Roy West, the head baseball coach at Silo Junior High, has been placed on administrative leave, accused of intentionally hitting and bruising players with baseballs.

“The allegation is if they were not doing everything the way they were supposed to, he would make them stand up with their backs toward him and he would throw balls at them,” said Bryan County Sheriff Ken Golden.

Golden said the allegation was made by a parent and an investigation is underway. Detectives are currently attempting to interview players on the team, he said.

Meanwhile, West has been removed from his coaching duties at both the junior high and high school for the remainder of the season.

“We take reports of this type seriously,” said Silo superintendent Bill Caruthers.

“Based on an initial investigation by the junior high principal, the junior high baseball coach was removed from all coaching duties for the remainder of the school year and placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of a full investigation. We are cooperating with the county sheriff's department in their investigation.”

Caruthers declined additional comment.

In addition to coaching the junior high team, West is an assistant baseball coach at Silo High School, a traditional small-school baseball power in Oklahoma.

He has been at Silo for 15 years.

ALTUS APPROVED TO START SEASON A WEEK EARLY

Altus has long played Vernon, Texas, to start its football season.

But a miscommunication between the schools in their last contract put that in jeopardy, as the originally agreed-upon date for 2013 was a week before the season was scheduled to begin.

Last week at the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association's board meeting, Altus made an appeal to be allowed to start its season a week earlier, asking for a one-time exception to the rule.

Continue reading this story on the...


by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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by Ryan Aber
Reporter
Ryan Aber has worked for The Oklahoman since 2006, covering high schools, the Oklahoma City RedHawks, the Oklahoma City Barons and OU football recruiting. An Oklahoma City native, Aber graduated from Northeastern State. Before joining The...
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by Scott Wright
Reporter
A lifelong resident of the Oklahoma City metro area, Scott Wright has been on The Oklahoman staff since 2005, covering a little bit of everything on the state's sports scene. He has been a beat writer for football and basketball at Oklahoma and...
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