High school football: What coaches and players are saying about Class 6A proposals

The Oklahoman polled the Class 6A football coaches about the two proposals they are voting on for Class 6A football. Here, along with some players' responses, are some of their answers.
by Ryan Aber and Jacob Unruh Modified: April 7, 2013 at 10:37 pm •  Published: April 7, 2013
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photo - CLASS 6A HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: Jenks' Trey'Vonne Barr'e hoist the championship trophy after the Trojans defeated Norman North in the Class 6A Oklahoma state championship football game between Norman North High School and Jenks High School at Boone Pickens Stadium on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, in Stillwater, Okla.   Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman
CLASS 6A HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: Jenks' Trey'Vonne Barr'e hoist the championship trophy after the Trojans defeated Norman North in the Class 6A Oklahoma state championship football game between Norman North High School and Jenks High School at Boone Pickens Stadium on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, in Stillwater, Okla. Photo by Chris Landsberger, The Oklahoman

Do you agree that a change needed to be made to 6A football? Why or why not?

Montgomery — “Yes. A change will create a more competitive environment in which all teams face similar challenges week in and week out. A change will also create more involvement in football among student athletes from the smaller schools.”

Steve Chard, Enid — “The change is being applauded by some and hated by others … so it depends on who you ask. The bottom line is we are a medium sized state with a large discrepancy in the largest class so there is no perfect scenario for our largest class here in Oklahoma.”

Darrell Hall, Midwest City — “Yes, (it) evens the playing field for all concerned.”

Jeremy Dombek, Edmond North -- “I think Oklahoma high school football is a good product. I think people across the country recognize that it's good and us being the highest level in 6A I just don't want to see anything that can water it down or tarnish it. Will that do it? I don't know. That remains to be seen.”

Brickman — “I feel there should be no change. The east side schools have decided not to split like the west side schools. There are no rules that say you must split when you have 3,000-5,000 students. Big question is how much bigger will they get? They are all growing areas. Will Broken Arrow have 6,000 students one day? I think a question should be asked to administrators on both sides: Why do west side schools split and why do east side schools not split?

Patterson — “Not really. I realize that there is a large difference in enrollment from top to bottom, but I don't like the idea that we, or anyone else, is good simply because we are big. We are fortunate in the fact that our communities and administrations have made a commitment to excellence in all things we do.

“I believe that this ‘change' comes from the idea of ‘every kid gets a trophy.'

“The only change that made sense to me was the idea promoted at the meeting in Edmond by David Fisher of Yukon and that was the Texas ‘split bracket' proposal. Like I said, nothing we discussed at that meeting has been proposed.”

What players are saying

Caleb Sturgeon, Putnam City West — “I believe splitting up 6A football is a great thing. I hope for them to split all 32 teams half and half. This will definitely give teams such as PC West a better chance to compete because it eliminates the teams that we cannot compete against. I think we will be able to have a better chance to grow and win more games, because the playing field will be a lot more level and the schedules will be more fair.”

Ethan Birdwell, Moore — “Really, it can help the schools out I think. Adding another class will give the room for larger schools while still not making the schools' population a consequence for the smaller schools. A school with a population of almost 5,000 students is going to have a lot more to pull into their sports programs than a school with 1,500. That isn't saying that smaller schools can't compete, but it will put a lot of schools on a more even playing field.”

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by Ryan Aber
Reporter
Ryan Aber has worked for The Oklahoman since 2006, covering high schools, the Oklahoma City RedHawks, the Oklahoma City Barons and OU football recruiting. An Oklahoma City native, Aber graduated from Northeastern State. Before joining The...
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by Jacob Unruh
Reporter
Jacob Unruh is a graduate of Northeastern State University. He was born in Cherokee and raised near Vera where he attended Caney Valley High School.During his tenure at NSU, Unruh wrote for The Northeastern (NSU's student newspaper), the...
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