High school wrestling: Shane and Dakota Head have helped maintain Tuttle's tradition

Shane was a two-time state champion and is currently a Tuttle assistant coach. His son, Dakota, is favored to win the 152-pound championship in Class 4A.
by Trent Shadid Modified: February 27, 2014 at 11:14 pm •  Published: February 27, 2014
Advertisement
;

photo - Tuttle's Dakota Head (red) and Vinita's Brooks Bowzer (white) wrestle in the 152 pound match at the 4A West Regional wrestling championship in Harrah on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. Tuttle's Dakota Head defeated Vinita's Brooks Bowzer to advance to state. Photo by KT King, The Oklahoman
Tuttle's Dakota Head (red) and Vinita's Brooks Bowzer (white) wrestle in the 152 pound match at the 4A West Regional wrestling championship in Harrah on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. Tuttle's Dakota Head defeated Vinita's Brooks Bowzer to advance to state. Photo by KT King, The Oklahoman

— The Tuttle wrestling program was built from family tradition.

Dakota Head and his father Shane are a perfect example.

Shane was a two-time state champion (1990, ’91) at Tuttle and is currently a Tigers assistant coach.

At the state tournament this weekend, Dakota is looking to build on the family legacy. With a 38-1 record, the senior is the favorite to claim the 152-pound title in Class 4A and become a two-time champion like his father.

“I’ve been around Tuttle wrestling my whole life, and people have expected me to be a state champion, and even do it multiple times,” said Dakota, who won his first title last year. “My dad and his good friend Trent London, who was Tuttle’s first state champ, they’ve brought me up and taught me what it takes to win since I was little.”

It’s those relationship that have helped Tuttle win the past five Class 4A tournament team titles, and 10 overall with the first coming in 1990.

“The biggest factor in the success of wrestling in Tuttle has been the support of the people, and specifically the families, that have come through here,” Shane said. “The past champions and all the parents come back now and give to the program. That’s been a big advantage for Tuttle. And it’s been very beneficial to kids like Dakota who have grown up around it.”

For Dakota, the road to becoming a state champion hasn’t been easy. He’s always felt the high expectations but struggled to find success early on, and he and his father both say balancing the relationship between wrestling and family has been a struggle at times.

“With Dakota, I can’t say enough about his work ethic,” Shane said. “Going through little league, he didn’t have the most success. He could’ve quit, went and done other things, but he just kept pushing and getting better. He’s only gotten better every year because of that work ethic, and that says a lot about him as a person. As a dad, it’s been very satisfying to watch him.”

Continue reading this story on the...

by Trent Shadid
Copy Editor
Trent Shadid is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He was born and raised in Weatherford, Okla., and attended Weatherford High School. Before joining The Oklahoman, he spent two seasons as an assistant wrestling coach at Weatherford High...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    CDC: U.S. has first confirmed case of Ebola in Dallas
  2. 2
    Netflix to shake up movies with 'Crouching Tiger 2'
  3. 3
    Donald Trump Tricked Into Retweeting Serial Killer Pic
  4. 4
    'Transparent' on Amazon Prime, reviewed: It’s the fall’s best new show.
  5. 5
    Brits Unwittingly Give Up Firstborns for Free WiFi
+ show more