Homeowner charged in deadly Mich. porch shooting

Published on NewsOK Modified: November 15, 2013 at 4:57 pm •  Published: November 15, 2013
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Civil rights groups, including the NAACP and the Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network, have held numerous local rallies and vigils since Nov. 2, and protesters have compared the case to the death of Martin, who was black and unarmed. Neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman was acquitted in July of second-degree murder.

On Friday, the Detroit branch of the NAACP applauded the charges filed against Wafer.

"Often, many of us are very anxious and impatient when it comes to justice being equally applied in every situation," the group said in a statement. "This particular case had the appearance that it might have been headed down the same road. While no trial has been held, and Mr. Wafer has yet to be brought before the court, anxiety is still high as the jury is still a long way out."

So-called "stand your ground" laws were at the heart of the Zimmerman case and protect gun owners in at least 23 states, including Michigan, who claim self-defense in shootings.

Michigan's 2006 law has some similar language to Florida's statue, said Peter Henning, a professor at Wayne State University Law School, "but it's quite limited."

"If you are threatened, you may use deadly force to protect yourself," he said.

Worthy said the state's self-defense law is not called stand your ground.

"There is no duty to retreat if you're in your own home," she said. "Someone who claims lawful self-defense, must have an honest and reasonable — not honest or reasonable — belief of imminent death or imminent great bodily harm of himself or another person, and the use of force that's used must be necessary to prevent that imminent death or great bodily harm of himself or another person."

McBride's mother, Monica McBride, wants just one question answered: What led to her daughter's death?

"I can't imagine what that man feared from her. I would like to know why," she said during a news conference at a Southfield hotel an hour after Wafer was arraigned.

The 19-year-old's father, Walter Ray Simmons, called Wafer a "monster."

"I couldn't accept no apology because my daughter don't breathe no more," Simmons said. "I believe this man took my daughter's life for no reason. We just want justice done."

The family also said it was hesitant to point to McBride's skin color as a reason she was shot.

"We didn't want to make this a racial situation. We didn't want to inflame anybody," family attorney Gerald Thurswell said. "The family is not taking a position that this is black or white. You don't take a gun and shoot somebody because there's a noise outside."

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Associated Press writer Jeff Karoub in Detroit contributed to this report.