Houston bayou's evolution into busy port is ongoing

By RAMIT PLUSHNICK-MASTI, Associated Press Modified: March 26, 2014 at 10:25 pm •  Published: March 27, 2014
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— A century ago, the Houston Ship Channel was nothing more than a bayou meandering into the Gulf of Mexico. Today, massive ocean-going vessels carrying thousands of containers zip in and out of the channel, where a barge collided with a ship over the weekend, spilling 170,000 gallons of gooey tar-like oil into the water.

Though the cause of Saturday’s crash is still under investigation, the increase in ship congestion highlights the need for more maintenance, dredging, high-tech navigation systems and other improvements to ensure safe travel through the narrow waterway. Add to this a domestic oil boom, exports of liquid natural gas, the expected expansion of the Panama Canal and the whiff of possible trade relations with Cuba and the growth takes on broad economic and safety implications.

“If it’s not done properly, there could be a safety issue,” said Thomas Marian, general counsel of Houston-based Buffalo Marine Service, a company that has a fleet of 36 barges and 18 push-boats whose primary purpose is to refuel vessels going in and out of the area.

Maintenance issues

About 95 percent of the nation’s commerce moves across water. Yet the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, credited with creating the waterborne highway from Brownsville, Texas — on the Mexican border — to Panama City, Fla., is unable to keep up with the growing maintenance responsibilities of the channels, ports and canals that facilitate this trade.

Port authorities nationwide pay into a fund designed to cover maintenance costs. The Port of Houston pays about $100 million annually into the fund but gets back only about $25 million — about half of the $50 million needed to maintain one of the world’s busiest channels, said Roger Guenther, the Port of Houston’s executive director.

The port typically handles about 70 ships daily, plus 300 to 400 tugboats and barges. And Gulf of Mexico traffic — especially of large ships — is expected to increase with the opening next year of the Panama Canal expansion.

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