How a Mohawk brought Guthrie defensive lineman Trevor Blassingame and his father even closer

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS — In 2010, Trevor Blassingame was a freshman working to make Guthrie's varsity team. When he did as a second-string defensive tackle, Doc made the bet that if Trevor became a starter he would shave his head and get a Mohawk. A few weeks later, Trevor was starting.
by Jacob Unruh Modified: November 29, 2013 at 10:00 am •  Published: November 28, 2013

— Trevor Blassingame never expected his father to deliver on a promise so well.

Doc Blassingame, though, surprised Trevor and everyone else when he first appeared at a Guthrie football game in 2010 sporting a tall, blue Mohawk as the result of a simple motivational bet between father and son.

It's become so much more.

“It was a big role in pushing myself, making myself better and trying to be the best,” Trevor said. “He just said he'd do something crazy. I didn't know he was going to go with his hair and a straight Mohawk and stick it up that high. That's my dad; he's pretty crazy.”

In 2010, Trevor was a freshman working to make Guthrie's varsity team. When he did as a second-string defensive tackle, Doc made the bet that if Trevor became a starter he would shave his head and get a Mohawk.

A few weeks later, Trevor was starting after Cody Doyle suffered an injury.

“All the kids went crazy,” Doc said about the initial reaction to his hair. “I've been bonding with the kids now and everybody here and I just love them. I just fell in love with all of the kids here.”

Trevor never left the starting lineup and has since developed into one of Class 5A's top defensive tackles. He has 103 tackles and 13 sacks this season for the top-ranked Bluejays, who play No. 6 Collinsville at 7:30 p.m. Friday in a semifinal at Sapulpa.

But the bet almost never happened.

In 2008, Doc was involved in a horrific car wreck. He suffered significant injuries to his head, shoulder and leg and had to be revived after suffering an adverse reaction to medication.

His life was forever changed.

“That's when I decided, ‘OK, God, you've given me a lot but I need to take more responsibility over what I've got,'” Doc said. “So I moved here (from Bethany) to be with my boys and try to raise them, be their dad in a better way and I've grown closer to them.”

For Trevor, it was another shock from his father when he nearly lost him for good.

But it's also something that fuels him on the football field.

“I love him. Every game he says, ‘Take my heart out and play.' I take that to heart and play my hardest,” Trevor said.

The bond between Trevor and Doc is unique and stems from his birth in 1995, just months after the death of Doc's mother.

She suffered a stroke the day after the bombing of the Murrah Building and died a few months later, never meeting Trevor.

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by Jacob Unruh
Reporter
Jacob Unruh is a graduate of Northeastern State University. He was born in Cherokee and raised near Vera where he attended Caney Valley High School.During his tenure at NSU, Unruh wrote for The Northeastern (NSU's student newspaper), the...
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